Genuinely GG
Genuinely GG

Episode · 1 year ago

Kati Morton

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Anita takes over as the main interviewer when they welcome psychologist Kati Morton on the show!

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Straw media to another episode of genuinely gg I am here with my always cooky friend, Anita. How are you okay? I'm good. I'm good. I'M gonna think you've lost more weight. You think so? MMM, it could be the the cut of the pants. I wasn't even looking at your thighs, but yes, that's what, probably what it is. It's probably the cut of your pants. Oh my God. Yeah, well, you've definitely lost some weight and you've definitely been working your ass off, which makes me happy about this conversation, because we talked to Katie. We hit those trigger points that you're sort of dealing with, as far as you're not able to say no to people, you take on a million tasks, you have stress, you drink five thousand cups of coffee, twenty four ounces is you don't sleep well, you don't eat. You she's really able to start the dissection process of what people with a lot of anxiety and stress need to do. I can't, I seriously, I can't stop thinking about the body shake. I mean that by Schick was was actually was a good I'm surprisingly as of how can I say how stupid it almost is? Did you feel stupid? No, just the concept of like just get up and shake it off. Simple, simple. Is that the word? Simple? Simple, not just something that's simple, actually made a little bit of a difference and I, and I do think that I could see myself like getting up between like meetings now and stuff and I'll between just shaking it off. So she had bought a shakes with Katie and apparently now she's able to work. I touched a little bit too deep onto my past in selfinfliction cutting that I used to do and God, Oh my God, that made me want to like spark up the joints so fast and like get high, but I was so scared to get you high and that you were going to fuck up the whole your first time. So I did it and I just took my deep breaths mentally and just like I went back to the yeah, you don't gotten deep. It was funny, it was informative, it was a great conversation. I'm really looking forward to having all of you guys listen to this. Let's go ahead and introduce Katie Morton. You know her from Shaws of sunset. You know she doesn't hold back. I was starting to be one of those weird people with my dance moves. I was on inhibited, I was free, I didn't care. At one point I laid on the floor and I was like a octopus, starfish kind of think today's guest, this is someone that kind of you know, hit's a very soft spot for me. So to switch things up today, a Gigi has given me the honor and the opportunity to take lead in the conversation. And so Katie is best known for being a Youtuber with a self title channel. She has developed her own mental social network. She has leverage social media to share mental health information worldwide. For the past eight years. She has gained one million subscribers and over eighty million views on youtube. She has license. She has a license marriage and family therapist, or she is sorry, and has a private practice in Santa Monica. Katie received her bash's degree in psychology and later earning her master's and clinical psychology from pepper dines graduate school. And you have appeared on from e News, CBS, the doctors, Katie Lay's morning news, good dela. You've been showcased on UK's Glamor magazine and the list goes on and on and on. You've published your first book. Are you okay? And this is a guide to caring for your mental health, and now you've followed up with the book traumatized, which is to identify, understand and cope with PTSD and emotional stress. That's me. Yes, you and wish, whish. Have to say this is available for pre order or it's going to be on shelves on...

September seven. Isn't she pretty? My basing pretty. Actually, yes, she's very beautiful. So again, you could buy this on September seventh will be on shelves. So, Katie, I'm your mainly specialized and experiencing with disus, eating disorder, self harming behaviors, anything that's just related to mental health. And so, essentially, you have accomplished a lot and and we are so excited to have you here today on genuinely GGE. So we want to give you a warm, warm, very special welcome to our show and thank you for being her, Katie Morton. Yeah, thank you for having me. I'm excited to be here. Katie. Thank you so much for being here, and I just want to take a second and bring light to a situation that you may not be aware of, and I'd like to inform you about. Is that the reason that Anita is doing your intro today, which I usually do forever old guests, is Anita is one of my dearest, dearest friends and she's very high strung on anxiety and stress and her nerves tend to take over her, and I tried to explain to her, I said, you got this, this is your arena, this is your ball game, you are dealing with this, so I want you to take over. So she was very nervous in just putting all this together and I just want you to know I'm really proud of you right now. I needa, for doing that. Yes, it's okay, you smashed it. You smashed it. It was it was a good job. So thank you so much, Katie, for joining us. There is a world of people out there that are dealing with an array of forms of stress and they come in all different channels and all different forms and they affect US differently. We want to talk to you today about your expertise and the questions that someone who actually suffers with stress and anxiety like Anita, the questions that you would have, which is, you know, perhaps going to be very similar to what a lot of people would be questioning. I wanted to also mentioned a very interesting conversation starter. We all see what Britney Spears is going through right now, this conservatorship, and she wants out of it. The court has denied her. She's going back firing people, people are resigning, she's going back. I think. I don't know. I feel like sometimes I maybe I'm the only one who thinks maybe it was there for a reason, maybe it wasn't handed to the smartest, to people, her her family or whatnot. But I feel like there's an underlying issue with Brittany that needs to be definitely addressed and and maybe handing her that much power when it comes to money or or decisionmaking is not a safe thing for her life or her children's lives, you know. So we see one side of it and not all sides of it. So what are your what's your take? Do you see that similarly? Is that something you know common? Yeah, I agree with you ged. I mean again, we don't know right. I'm not her therapist, I'm not in the inside circle, but I do know from past experience getting conservatorship and having patience. I used to work in a hospital setting, so most of my patients who had schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, skis effective disorder. They were conserved and I know just how difficult it is for someone to be conserved. So for those people who don't understand, conservatorship means that do to some discip ability or mental illness or something going on, I am unable to make good decisions for myself. Therefore, I give my rights pretty much a way to someone and you can be conserved by the state. So it can be someone that the state puts an eye which I think is what Britney switched over to now, or it can be usually we prefer it to be a family member because, you know, we would all hope that our family would have our best interest in mind. Now, with Brittany, obviously it's difficult because there's only so many things people we see in media and, you know, online,...

...and I think we'd all agree that online isn't always correct. They can make up any stories about us or say whatever they want, but we, I think we do know. I believe she's share that she does have bipolar disorder and that can come along with what is called mania, and that's when we can be super impulsive and it can be difficult for us to make good decisions and we can do things that we normally wouldn't. A lot of my patients will say they only feel like they're themselves, and so I believe that because they upheld it in the courts, there must be something there that we don't understand, like maybe she isn't quite managing her bipolar disorder in a way that makes her suitable to make decisions, or maybe I've been behaviors. We don't know. Right it's and it's not our business either. I think she has every right to a, you know, a private life, but those things could make her financially or like even just her business or with her children, like any of those areas of her life could be difficult for her to manage appropriately. Right. You know, I I grew up a little bit of a wild child and I've had my crazy moments. I mean we Brittany Shave her head, come out with a baseball bad, you know, slammy windows. I've had worse situations, but I never was put in a situation of needing that type of watch over me. I was going through phases of my life. I was going through stress factors that I only knew how to cope by lashing out with anger. That was my way of dealing with stress and once I stopped dealing with my stress in that way, I began getting panic attacks because my only form of release anger was was fighting and and punching people in. I also went through a history of cutting for many years when I was a teenager. So all these things I was stopping and stopping and then panic attacks came. You know, do you get panic attacks? Like yeah, regularly. I not regularly. I get little, I think, little attacks, but I think I've had maybe, I think, three panic attacks my whole life and more recently. Say, well, Covid, I think increased stressing out of us, whether we yeah, whether we're able to admit it or not, what our stress responses, that's the term we use, is like fight flight or if we can't do those things, we freeze. Rite a lot times with your fight flight freeze. And covid was an intense threat right and it shot us all into our stress response. Whether, and I always tell people, I'm like, you didn't have to lose someone to covid or have covid yourself to be affected by it. We were all affected by it and my patients with anxiety, the ones with social anxiety, at first were like who, this is so easy, it is amazing, stay home the people. But still it would come out in panic attacks because because that stress, anxiety, that feeling is still there right and it seems like, how do you, how do you tell your you know, patients to deal with with the panic attacks and just overall, to deal with with the stress and and just to do you? Well, why don't you ask about for yourself, because each patient is so unique in individual that it's sort of hard to say you deal with it this way and that's the whole way for everybody. You know what I mean. So why don't you what are your main triggers of stress? And then maybe, like, we can see what Katie would suggest for you. Okay, so I'm going to use this as a therapy session for myself. Amazing, thanks, guys. Okay, I've been begging her to go to therapy, by the way, so you're not in the know. So she's been trying to give me to go to therapy. She's been trying to also prescribe with her gig weed, like cannabis, on me, thinking that that's going to be the cure, which is hosses all she has and she's anxiety driven. She has a hundred of these starbucks coffeey for out a lot of Catheline. So that probably does not help much either. But yeah, so I believe that. You know, with my I think. Yes, you know, we went into this, you know, quarantine and everyone was home and we weren't doing anything. And I'm in the event planner and so and my industry. We just kind of went...

...to like zero and then suddenly, so then I had anxiety of like, Oh my God, I'm not making money, I'm what am I going to do? All these events, this is my life. So then you're kind of sitting around. Then after you you know, then you deal with that and all the stresses. Then suddenly the world opens up kind of and everyone wants to have a party, no one wants to work, and so you get a hundred found cause on a hugard events and say yes to all of them. How to say no, because I'm a people pleaser, and so all this is going on and it's like then, you know, luckily I don't have any kids, they would because they would be so neglected, but I do having no friends and family and I do have to take care of the work and the money in this and that. So I I just so again. I've had a couple panic attacks. My eating has gone to hell, like I like. I don't, I think sometimes I I won't wash my hair for like two weeks, like I I'll try to take my body showers every day. I don't have time. If I'm in the shower I feel like I'm missing something with work and I don't have time for that. I don't have time to like make a proper meal. What. What do you? What do you do? What do you? How do you? How do I fix this? And how do I deal with this girl dress? I saw that right there. Don't have you thinks the first slide. This is my head. Yeah, so how do I? What? How do you deal with this, with ches dress in this just anxiety and everything for me. Yeah, yeah, no, I mean, and it is a lot and I think anybody was anxiety would tell you it feels like a lot. Right. It's not like we just like anxiety is not fun. It's not. It is motivating within a little, like a small amount, but after that it becomes detrimental. Yes, and so I really think for you and for honestly, for everybody. This is something that can help anybody who's struggling with anxiety is identifying your triggers, like gg mentioned, like what are your main triggers for this, and it sounds like, just based on what you said, it sounds like making others happy is a huge trigger, pleasing people in work, being good at work, and I don't know if maybe money is also, because money stressful for all of us right, even if you have a lot or a little, it doesn't matter, you're still managing it and trying to figure out how to deal with it. I think maybe those could be some of the triggers, but it's it's helpful for you to just take a beat and consider what is upsetting you most, like if you're able to remember those panic attacks that you've had, like what took place the week leading up. That's really helpful information for any therapist because then I can I can try to figure out what the main triggers were for you in that moment and then we try to find ways to better cope. So kind of like what gg was saying, how when she was a kid she was like anger out. I was totally that kid. To by the way, gg I didn't know how else to express myself other than through anger until I started therapy, thank God. But you, we have to find a healthy outlets for you, and that can be anything like I actually encourage you to try this today and port back standing up and doing a full body shake. So when our body that I know sounds really crazy, but like a dog out of the pads to yeah, yeah, Shaqui, like a crazy hips like like all the way shit, and then stomp your feet a little, shake and shake it, shake it with and then shake out your hands, like she got. Wag Your brain, shake your head, shake your brain, shake your brain, shake your tits. Nipples, Nipples, nipples. She doesn't really have big BOOBS. I don't move. That's okay. Shake. Oh, there they go. There, Jag, there we go. I just wobble like like they just wabble. And then we take a deep breath and we sit down and surprisingly enough, that doing a full body shakes to how I feel. I'm just curious if we take a second, actually we could feel. Yes, like feel I feel hot. I feel like I like I got look at little adrenaline rush to is that like? It just yeah, it's like a release of EGO. If you're releasing ego in my getting a rush of positivity all in one second by doing that, yeast.

So to do those breath I get out of break to I was tell you're no judgments. What that does is, when we're in our stress response, that fight, flight freeze, what our nervous system does is it cuse us up to take action, right, and I to fight. Am I going to run away? Like, what am I going to do? But when we feel anxiety, it's just uncontrollable worry, right, we're constantly worrying about the what if? There's nothing we can really do right, you can't fight that and you really can't run from that. And so our bodies cued us up for action and there's no action we can take. And so forcing that action through a body shake actually releases or what they call complete that stress response. It gets that out of your system, and so I'd encourage you to incorporate that in even like I do it personally at night, if because when I try to go to bed as when like, anxious thoughts will start to swirl, like Oh, what if tomorrow that doesn't go well, or you know, and if I find that I to stand up and shake out and at first I feel like and then when I breathe out it's it kind of comes down for me, and so that's one way to kind of help you in the moment. Better Cope. We're going to take a quick break, but when we come back. I went through a lot of different phases of my life where I've gone through intense levels of different forms of therapy, different forms of healing. I went through a lot of different phases of my life where I've gone through intense levels of different forms of therapy, different forms of healing for whatever I'm going through in that period of time. And one of the places that I went away too, was amazing. It was more of a spiritual retreet and all throughout the day, every day we really in the middle of nowhere in the woods. It was very, very it was amazing place. But every day we had this thing which was like a music therapy, but not typical music therapy. It was they instructor would have a song and it was designed very specifically with the tempo. It's almost like a trans it comes up, the temple goes up. It beats a beats of beats. Were fast and then it comes right and over a course of maybe ten minutes, and he would say just release your body, feel with your body what the earth is telling you, with the sounds are telling you. And in the beginning I was kind of peeking through my eye and looking to people, you know, doing that little bean and I was kind of giggling because I'm seeing people just doing some funky putting stop and after like the third or fourth day of being there, I was, you know, eventually releasing my anxieties, slowly, but I was starting to be one of those weird people with my dance moves. I was on inhibited. I was free. I didn't care. At one point I laid on the floor and I was like an octopus, starfish kind of thing, because that's where it would let me to. It led me there and I was okay with it. Yeah, I didn't care. So it was such a release of ego for me. That experience was my ego release, but it took me many, many, many years, many traumas, to get there again. I said when I was a teenager I was a big cutter. I was going to bring that up again right now. I was a big cutter. That was my healing. You know, I unfortunately was put into therapy at a very young age and I had a horrible, horrible therapist. Her name is Wendy Fisher, bitch. So so sorry is I can't get stood for. She was my therapist. So when days, maybe twelve or thirteen years old, and she told me by the time I'm eighteen I'm either going to be dead or in jail for life, as if that's helpful. Why do people say things like that? So she said I need because of that, I need therapy two to three times per week, or else I'm going to be dead or in jail for life by the time I'm eighteen years old. A little manipulative, like a business move, I think my parents. I didn't know that...

...that's something I'm supposed to tell my parents. I mean my parents are sending me to this woman, so apparently they're I you know, this is where I'm supposed to be, this is what I'm supposed to be told. I had bad experiences, so I continued, you know, getting in trouble, but for me was when I didn't know how to punish the people who were hurting me in my life. I would punish myself with a razor blade. Yeah, of course, a lot of my self injury patients say it's like you get to finally express the hurt and pain you feel inside in an outside way, right, you know. And it didn't hurt, you know, and it's interesting that those cuts never hurt. I. You cannot feel it, and I didn't realize that until years later, where I had healed so much of that, you know, part of my life, and I said I just want to see, like what this is what it was like, and I got a little thing and I pricked it and I screw it all. I tell my how did I used to, because I mean from top to bat, my body would be sliced and now lasted for about three four years of my life and I was always able to get out of pe class because I would tell my parents, you know, I don't want to get dressed for pe and be I don't want anyone to see. And they were so probably shocked or embarrassed or just completely did not know what the fuck to do with it. They were like okay, so they wrote the notes and and everything was fine and, you know, as long as no one talked about it now and said anything, you know, so it's like people find ways to handle stress. That was my you know, it was your outlet, it exactly. And then, you know, fist fighting was my outlet, and then drugs were my outlet, and then alcohol and then, you know, it just kept sort of going until I finally became this little Buddha. And I don't know how it happens. It's probably all the weed I smoke, but I healed a lot. I definitely healed a lot and I want to I want that for Anita, because I see where Anita is going with her stress and her anxiety and it's not in a healthy but directions not and it's interesting that, like you know, obviously something from childhood triggered like the whole PTSD, for you to have anxiety, to get to the anger and all that stuff, and then you had ways of relieving yourself or, you know, releasing that. I don't really have. I don't really I don't know what I do to I guess I'm going to start shaking and I think that's going to help me. But what, what do I need to do? I mean, I'm not gonna lie. I mean I take medication for this. I take medications super high anxiety, and again that's something that I know that you feel like I should try to do different. I just don't like off of it. I don't like the medication you're taking and I do not believe that anyone should prescribe you medication anti depresent Santasocottas, without current therapy happening with it. I do not think that. Sure, I wanted to St family right off on Sir go, go cure your that's the issue. No, no, it doesn't work like that. So stemps to this too, is that, you know, I come from a family my Dat, my dad, is a retired physician, and so heat we always were growing up going to therapy, talking about this. Having mental illness, having mental health, whatever it is, is not good, and so I think for me it was something. It's something that, like, I try to hide behind, which I do love that you really are trying to get that stigma away and you're trying to say that no, it's okay, you have to come to terms, you have to figure this out, you have to fix this, and so that's that's great. Thank you for doing that and doing this for millions of people. You need to read Katie's books. So I am going to read your books. I'm you know, I watched a lot of your pot different youtubes, like f from the last few days. So it's been like great and helpful. I mean I can talk to you about just so much, like just eating disorders, like I never thought I had anything. I want to talk about that. Let thank you for saying that. Is this an eating disort? I let me say it. Let me ask her. She because of her stress on her anxiety and her work, so to speak, she's not finding proper times to eat. Okay, she's not finding enough time to eat. So is that an eating disorder?...

Not necessarily. It kind of eating disorders kind of in the same way you do. You're talking about yourself, injury, even disorder of the same type of thing. They're coping skill. So it's really when we use food as a way to control ourselves or to numb out. So I don't know need to if you're not eating as a way to like not feel or if it's the anxiety, because I will be honest, my patients with really high levels of anxiety or like I struggle to know when I'm hungry. Like that's you know, and I'm just going, going, going going and then a crash, and so I would say that's what's happening. No, it's not an eating disorder, but if you're using food as a way to help you feel better, than yes, it is, and that's kind of the difference in a way that if that's even not clear, if anybody listening is like, well, that's not my situation. If you find your brain space is mostly taken up with thoughts about food, it's an eating disorder. I think I'm I think I have a lot of issues in a sense that I have. I think I do. Food does consume a lot of my thoughts and I don't do sometimes I feel guilty if I eat whatever and how my cheat days and I've always had body image disorder. Just a lot. I have a lot of issues. We got to work I'm going to call you some tomorrow or make an appointment to come to us, saying I wantica to see you. But so I think it's partially that I do have an eating disorder in a sense that I thought I didn't, because I'm not antarexic in the sense that I do eat and I'm not I've never made myself throw up, a lot of people do. Eat eating disorders of take all shapes and sizes. I'd honestly would. I think it's just my opinion. I don't know the stats, but I would argue that the act of the most common eating disorder is actually binge eating disorder, where people overeat and don't do any compets, indoor behavior like exercise, laxatives, throwing up, any of that. I think the you know that that is the most common and I've had many patients who we'd call it, they fall into what's called asfed, which is a horrible acronym for it's like otherwise specified eating or feeding disorder. And really what that means is maybe we don't quite meet the criteria for Anorexia or billimia or binge eating disorder, but we have something going on that makes our relationship with food not a healthy one. Yeah, definitely have definitely have that. Yeah, and I do want to say one thing real quick. You guys talked about medication and GG, I do agree with you that medication without therapy is is not ideal. I always talk about medication, especially, and I know not everybody has access to this, but especially not from a primary care doctor, meaning like your regular doctor. I really encourage people to see a psychiatrist because they specialize in the treatment of mental illness right in the psychiatrist in conjunction with some form of therapy. That could be from a therapist or psychologist or, you know, counsel or whatever you have available to you, because all research proves that with therapy and medication that gives us the best result. And as a therapist I make a lot of calls to doctors to tell them, Hey, these are the symptoms and seeing here's what's going on with my patient, because I'm spending more time with them and you know I'm your advocate and obviously you go into your appointments and try to tell them, hey, I don't like this one, it makes means hard to sleep, or I feel this way or that way. But you know, together we can make sure you get the right medication, because if you're still feeling this anxious, I would argue that it's very possible the medication is not working for you. Okay, do you think a good starting point maybe for Anita would be to learn how to say maybe no to a client and just say I need I need this couple days to myself, I need this week to myself. I need this month to myself. But whatever it is, is is that a healthy start, or is that too extreme for someone like Anita? I would say that that's that's a good thing to do, but I don't know if it's the best place to start. I think for starting, Anita, my homework for you would be to start paying attention to how you talk to yourself.

So what's the conversation that you have about work or about what you're doing? And I know that feels very tedious. You like I have a lot of thoughts every do you like Shit, am I going to be doing this forever? No, I want you to pick because the weird thing, just random factoid from research, we know that ninety three percent of the thoughts we've had or that we're having we've had before. So we're just having these repeat conversations like over and over, and so if you can pick out like your top five to ten, don't do any more than ten, but as long as there's at least five of these common thoughts, things like and I'm just I'm gonna speak personally. I'm lazy, I'm stupid, nobody likes me. Right. We have, we've all had those thoughts. Those are very common in yours are probably everybody has their own specific ones, like I never get enough done, or you know, I know that that girl at work doesn't like they wouldever. You know, we have these certain things, or my body looks terrible. So I want you to kind of get a hold of these top ones and then I want you to use what I call bridge statements, which means that instead of trying to do the opposite or like think positive, you know, just like fake it till you make it. Say No, I'm beautiful, amazing, everybody loves me, because our brains going to be like no, I don't believe that. Instead, let's build a bridge to the positive one. So A bridge statement to start out would be something like I'm open to trying this. I don't know if it's going to work, but Katie says it does, I'll give it a go. Or maybe I could believe in the future that I'm not as lazy as I think I am, you know. So we just just maybe's possibilities being open to it. I know it doesn't seem like a positive thought, but it's not native either. It's just in this bridge land, and then we'll slowly build on it, like if you start to feel like yeah, maybe these are kind of working, then that would be your birdt statement. I believe bird statements actually might help. Seems to be helping. I could think that I'm actually a worthwhile person. I think I might be able to write, and just doing that slowly and again. I know it sounds tedious, but our thoughts shave our life and if we can change just a couple of them, if we can work on five, I swear to God it will change your life. I agree. I agree with Katie completely and I would have to say in my opinion, that bridge is what I see a need to having the hardest time with is focusing on that bridge. She's a goal type of a person, which I think majority of people are. We see the end result as what we want. We don't realize what the first, first step is that we have to take in the thousands of steps after that in order to reach that goal, and it's a lot. That process is a lot. It's hard, it's painful, it's difficult, but knowing that you're getting to that end result makes it, you know, worth it for me, and I feel like that's something that you need to also focus on is not always that big picture, because you have you have big picture mentally, like you see like the Huh of everything you know. But it's hard because every guy you date, you see, are you walking down the aisle and having his babies? That's toxic in the first date. You know, every business. Okay, so we're going to be a multimillion dollar company. We're going to be shipping into this place, shipping to that place. Now we need to just sign up our company first with the the the company, you know, just said our registering our name. So I think those things cause stress because when you don't map out that bridge correctly, when you don't but your first foot onto the bridge and you just want to fly instead, we cause stress and anxiety because we usually will fail because we didn't do it properly. You know, wow, yeah, and it you needs. It's like not doing the black and white thinking, the all or nothing, that in or the out right. We want to find us we want to find a place where it's in the gray, where we're just like working on it, and it's hard, Anita, and your anxiety brains going to fight you to be like no, I have to do all of this a hundred percent. I have to...

...fix all of my thoughts. That's I was like, it's against the rules feed to do more than ten. Yeah, right, want you to keep it home, and so we do a little by little, baby steps. Yeah, baby's. Another thing that you do talk a lot about is social media and the causes of that with with bringing and stress and anxiety to people. How with my industry and with most people, you don't. You want to be tapped into the world and what's going on. What do you how do you suggest to deal with social media and not let it get to you and cause those anxieties? And that's a good question and yeah, like that's a great question. Fucking Charles, how do you deal with trolls? God, I block and mute with ease, because if somebody's that upset, it's just being out into strangers on the Internet. They've got bigger fish to FRY and it's not about you, which I know is heart trust me, as someone online, I know how hard it is to to hear people trash talk you when they don't know you at all. But my advice to people is to be very careful and selective about who you follow. I know we live in a space where people might get offended that, oh, I met them and they don't follow me. Anybody out there, don't feel like you have to follow me at all. You can if I if my content and what I'm putting out into the world isn't making you feel better or making you feel more connected, don't follow right and I think we have to kind of assess who we're spending because we're digesting it right, what we see, what we engage with, work, digesting and social media allows with this huge comparison factor and to protect, especially in need of what we're working on, to protect our self talk. We want to make sure that the people you're following and connecting with, our people who make you feel good and feel like a breath in that we're not looking and saying, Oh, I should be doing more, because that's only going to feed that anxious seeing. Like I follow all these other like planners and flop floors and I'm like, Oh my God, they just did another event and they're so busy and I am busy, but I'm not as busy or or they. They work with that person and so then it's like constantly better than they. I do also feel like I need to kind of keep that around so that it does motivate me. But then against I think you're right. I think just kind of pick and choose and not because I think you're motivated. Yeah, I would argue that maybe we don't need extra own for you to feel motivated. I think you're already very motivated. I think muting people for a little while is something I do, especially if it's like a friend that I think might be hurt, because if I don't feel able to say to them, Hey, I'm working on myself and this has nothing to do with you, it's actually me, like you're doing great and I love you, but I'm trying. I just gotta dig in and I can't be following people if you don't feel you can have that conversation. Muting is great on instagram and stuff like that, so that you don't have to know how to do that. Okay, Oh, yeah, go. When you go to their profile, I think you go to the three dots at the top and you can either turn on notifications or you can mute, and so I would just encourage you to mute and then this still looks like you're following them, but you won't see any of their posts. It's good to know a little late to the game sometimes. So it's okay, but but I think through social media we can be traumatized, we can feel overwhelmed, we can compare, we which makes us feel worse about ourselves and our self confidence can go down. And so I just really encourage you to be careful about who you follow and what content you let yourself digest and absorb and again mute and unfollow easily. was these. We're going to take a quick break, but when we come back, and I don't want to lie either, therapies hard work, at the work that gg's done, the work. I that it's it's not easy, but I can't tell you it's worth it. Thank you so much. I could, honestly, I know both of us probably talk to you for hours and hours days, our days...

...and I and I will probably definitely be in touch with you after this, you know. Yeah, having offer recommendations and referrals, because I really do think therapy is going to be life changing. Yeah, and I think that just connecting with that therapists is a big challenge and that's what sometimes people run away from. But you shouldn't. You should. You know, it's just it's yeah, and it's okay, and I don't want to lie either. Therapies, hard work, at the work that GG's done, the work I that it's it's not easy, but I can't tell you it's worth it. So just stick with it. You know that it will. You will feel better, you will find yourself feeling less anxious, you'll have less urgent you know, less panic attacks, all of less. I'd be easier for you to say no, all of that will come. Okay, okay, and then so this is a part of the flat part now. So we it's called. Forgive me, I have sinned. It's a little game that we like to play, and so I'm going to ask you a question or two, and so you just feel free to answer it or not. So have you ever been stressed out while writing your book on being stressed? That's a great question, and the truth about it is, yes, it was kind of there's been multiple times in my life, because I do mental health content, where I'm struggling with the thing that I'm working on, like when I was doing I did this whole Youtube series about burnout and I was super burned out at the time and the irony was not lost on me. I was like Geez, Louise, and then even writing my both of my books. I I don't I don't even know how to express to people how much work and effort goes into a book, but it is extremely overwhelming and I definitely feel stressed out while I'm doing it, while I'm writing about how to DSTRESS, and it's like take your own advice, Katie, right. So, yeah, it's inevitable, right, it's an evitable we off, we all stress out. It's just learning how to cope with our stress and how to guide our stress. I'm not let our stress guide us. Yes, you know. And also just getting to feel like, for me, I know my red flags for when I need to take a break, like, oh, am I like tearful a lot, like you know, when I'm watching TV or even talking to a friend, I want to cry, and then a Carlist in the music and I want to cry. I'm like, I got to get back into my therapist, like maybe things are things are escalating. You haven't smoked a lot during this during this part while I was afraid because so anita doesn't smoke pot and all because she claims she gets super stoned just by sitting next to me. I mean, I mean she's talking about having chest pressure and high and things were flying around cotact high and this is like your first time sort of, you know, leading the podcast, and I just wanted to you to be as appreciated be blamed for you. I kind of she did so that I could believe you for fucking up. But yes, okay, well, thank you too, great. Thank you. I appreciate that you took that into convention. Marijuana, it can be helpful. Like, I know it's not for everybody, but people always ask like, oh, what are your thoughts about cbd or Thc or weed and general role or any other you know drug to assist, and I know with when it comes to weed specifically, there's tons of research to prove that it does help people and so, you know, obviously consult with your doctor and assess your own situation, but I don't see anything wrong with it personally. And they're doing some research on Stilocybin, which is like part of what magic mushrooms would be for those people don't know. That is something that my brother in law wants me to get into it. There's a place that does it and it's kind of it not. It's not Iowaska, but it's in that family. So I was just going to ask, have you ever psychedelics? A lot of popular done anything like that to cope with your scrip? I know if you can answer that or not, but have you ever ientially can, but I haven't. Yeah, not because I have any judgments around it. Again, I'm just like a I don't think judgment has a place in our life. It doesn't help with anything. Right. If it works for you, it works for you, awesome. But for me I've I've never really used drugs at all to cope with how how I manage. I think because I started therapy at such a young age, like I was fifteen. I know people started at a younger age, but I feel like once I was...

...dealing with things I was, you know I was feeling, I would already had the support. Yeah, I just wanted to ask a completely off topic right now. As far as I drugs, I used to, but I would say now, because they're doing enough research around the the use of them and we have the abilities, especially in California and other states where it's legal, we are able to know exactly what we're taking. Right because, like back when I was a teenager, like you, drive into a parking lot and pick up weed from like a stranger, essentially, and like you hope that it is what they say it is right. But now we're able to say, like, Oh, I want this amount of THC, this men to CBD. There's and it's way more complicated than that, but I think as long as it's able to we know how it affects people and it's been studied a little bit. I think that if it's helpful for people, I think that's wonderful. One of my best friends is doing research right now and working on treatment using psilocybin and how that's helpful for trauma and I have tons of patients and viewers of like who used ketamine infusions to help with their intense depression and suicidal thoughts. So I definitely think what we used to think of as illicit drugs is not what what it is now. You know, I think things have definitely shifted and thank God. Right, yeah, okay, well again, thank you again for everything. And your book traumatizes. I am I am going to well, it's pre order. Have to wait till September. Yeah, I mean maybe I can get you one squeezy one out a little earlier and he's sorry. Yeah, okay, I she's yeah, I think so. It's an unedited version, but you'll get the gist. Okay, I'll be in touch. I'm excited. Okay, again, thank you. Thank you. Thank you for being here today. Yes, yes, I think you. Yeah, thank you. So, Katie, a lot of people have so much out there to learn from you and your words. So look her, at Katie Morton. She's out there. Her Youtube is huge. You guys. Thank you, Katie. Thanks getting yeah, thank you. Have a good one for you. Two. Thanks. That was that was really cool. That was great. Okay, what through ten would I get? You get an eleven. Who really did a great job. You did a great job. You seem too nervous with the intro, but that's okay. You you were trying to do it the way I was doing it and I want you to do your own in need a thing, you know. You were really trying to that. Yeah, yeah, but you're good mentor and a good you're good at it. So if it's my style, that's not your sty you got a creature and style. No, no, you have such a good stuff. You did great. I think she was great. I like Katie. She's really informative. It's hard, I think, for anyone when you're in a conversation with someone who's a therapist. People naturally just start unloading on them, and it's in every setting. And I think that that's what happened, because not only are we sitting here asking her for her tools and recommendations on how to deal with it, we're naturally getting triggered with our own stories and we're just blurting it out to her like, you know, hoping she's going to shrink us right now to hear. But she was so nice and she was so helpful, pretting a nice and and that whole shaking. UHHU, can you do it again? Like I hope remove your microphone right now. I want to say I want to see you just shake it like it's a polar a picture. Now it was more to it than that. Just everything and just let loose in your head, your body, and then just gives me a little dizzy, doesn't it get you don't? Then you just just breathe, let it all out. Yeah, Oh my God, see, that's the that's that's a half part that she's talking about. That you think you're actually that's that's bad, right...

...and left. Okay, there we go, so that's sad. I think it's great. I think the I think a lot of it does stemp back to going to your past and fingering out because like, why am I so anxious? What happened that made me like that? So just to to be able to to get to, you know, comfortable someone and talk to him about it, I think that's great and I feel like there's so many people out there that can relate. Yes, Sus, and you know what, it's not always a trauma, yes, that has to have happened in order to make us anxious or anxiety driven. Sometimes you are just a product of your environment and maybe the people around you operated the similar ways and that's just what you're raised into. You're not going to be different than what you're, you know, in front of Right. And then there's Times that we do have chemical embalt and says that are more significant than others that maybe elevate those situations or elevate our moods, where medications can help sort of, you know, bring that down, but it's I don't think it's a trauma you should be looking for, because it sounds like you were asking Katie. Well, what happened to me? Like nothing happened, like you're like gg went through the and it makes sense for her to have all this. I didn't go through that. Why am I? You know what I means to go through? I feel like there wasn't maybe something, but it's also like, I don't know how. I don't take my like I don't cut myself, I don't like no, but right, Jelo or whatever. So what? I want to know what my it's different. You found different ways to cope. Your coping mechanism is by not sleeping, not eating and just working. That's how you cope with your stress. If you were to stop while that, you would probably start getting panic attacks. Yeah, I know, I would, hundred percent until you start healing that, because panic attacks are our bodies telling us to stop. So the fuck down, you know, stop, relax, get help, help me, help me. It's your body screaming. It almost feels like death, because that's what your body, you know, going through. and You you went through. You had a one. I had it as a disorder. I had to say. I remember. You're like we were there, Ye are, Huh. We were in the car. Yeah, I was having a panic attack, and you are. Remember you had a panic yeah, I get them. I'm not afraid of them anymore. I think that's the difference between before. I think what sets a panic attack off and most people end up in the emergency room. They're like there on die. It's because we're afraid of what's happening and we don't under stand it. And then I went through, you know, years of therapy and I understood what a panic attack is. And once that happened, I said, okay, the panic attack is happening. I need to like, I need to control my breathing, I need to, you know, shift my thoughts, because that's what was happen. We were in the car. I was like, I was tucking my pause, I was sorry, and you put the seat back a little bit. Yeah, and I was like, Oh my God, you're really pull over. Like what do you want me to do? Like you what you want me to do, like I remember, and you just kind of dealt with it and yeah, and your way. I was like, I'm fine, I just need to focus on my breathing. One thing I learned was a seven eleven technique, which is easy to remember because the seven eleven stores, but it's to focus your breathing, to get an inhale of seven, to hold it and then let it out. On Account of eleven. It's next to fucking impossible, even when you're not having a panic attack. But it's the distraction of your mind and and redirecting your oxygen to your brain that's slows everything down. You know, they say, name three things you could see, name three things you could feel, three things that you know are touching, and it's about distracting your mind, because a panic attack is just your body's way of saying, you fucked me up at some point, I'm coming back. And now it comes back and you're like, Oh my God, I'm dying, I'm having a heart attack. One, yeah, I can't breathe in. They're like Pang of Huck, but they still have the kind of gives you those nine. One. That's fine, because I said seventy eleven technique. I thought I was like you drive in to a seventy eleven and get a slurpee, and you could do that about her. If you're in the mirror, PNRYMAC...

...to drive bitch, gotas having a letter. Gonna get yourself a celebrity. So it was great. It was to day. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to kind of step in and be take the lead on this today, and you were great and I think that people would love to see you come back and try again and again and again, because, you know what, there's a lot of people out there that were probably love to have this opportunity to a podcast, and maybe they're nervous as well too, and watching you, you know, break through your nervous issue with this and doing it and scoring it's probably motivates people to thank you, guys. Thank you. We love you. She lets you show some love and support to Anita for doing this right. That in the Commons down there in the reviews. Subscribe, Bitch. Yeah, I mean, I don't want to go. I don't want her to fire my ass, to get me like yes, give me feedback to Nah and let me know what you want from us and from me. That sounds very sexual. I'm not a part of that part, but thanks, guys. Let us know. Mom, thanks for listening to Geminely GIG. download new episodes every week and, if you haven't already, subscribe and be sure to leave us a rating and review. And while you're at it, check out some of the other great shows available on Straw hut media.

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