Genuinely GG
Genuinely GG

Episode · 1 year ago

Cancel Culture With Maz Jobrani & Tehran Ghasri

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week GG & Anita sit down with comedians Maz Jobrani and Tehran Ghasri. Listen in as they discuss all things 'cancel culture.' From Straw Hut Media Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

STRAWT media. You know her from Shaws of sunset. You know she doesn't hold back. Let me tell you this, toff not. You know when I said just a moment ago that I offended so many people on social media with my braids? Yes, what? None of those people were black. All right, can imagine. This is genuinely gg. Hey, guys, welcome to another episode of genuinely GG. I'm here with my girl and Nita. Hey girl, hey girl, how are you? I'm good. I'm hows that covid arm? Is it still covid arm? Is Um, you know, it's like it's still there. I'm still now. Have I started therapy? Have I done anything? Really, don't do anything since the last show. Wow, wow, because you know, I'm just like very recisy. I got some much going on that I just got a little, but the pains there. I'm still, you know, taking the pain away with my tin knoll and, yeah, and Advil, which is stupid, but yeah, well, I mean hopefully you take care of yourself and just go get that fixed. Yeah, do you notice anything different here? I do, I do. I took off my clopter and your yeah, I've had a Clis. By the way. I was like twelve or thirteen years old, I've had a clock nails and I took them off. I don't know why. I just got this weird craving. I'm like, you know what, I want to not have any cloks for a little while. I know me, I would. I think you're going to miss it because I, yeah, I did it for a little bit. Yeah, and and I went back to like doing a Gelics, even though I have like good nails. I just yeah, we both have really good now you're a really good this is like my shortened. This is some Peter's long. Not the same. No, it's not the same as a Quiot. So cliots are life it. Clots are fun. You could do whatever you want. You could tappy, make noise. You think you feel Sassier with the cuds? Yeah, yeah, you know, I love it and I'm sure I'm gonna miss it Lessa for sure. So has nothing to do with the Lijah. Then my heart that when I first was like, Oh, she's gonna be a responsible mom. She doesn't want to post because you I've balls out, or she doesn't want to like. So, wait a minute, bitch, I thought it was are you saying I was irresponsible, because I have long announced irresponsible. Ha Ha, I just you know, because you've changed so much and you're such a good mom whatever I thought it was like. You know what I am going to you know, it's so ironic that the topic of today's conversation is cancel culture, because what you just said, you're going to get canceled because so many meal salons are never going to be like, are you kidding me? Yeah, they might cancel. H I have like a mother's Society Group? I don't, but I will create one just for that comment, Anita, that I was a bad mom because I had long nails. It's not bad, I think. Honestly, I think I'm attacking you right now because I had a dream about you, like what, and I woke up sweaty and I did I despise your dream. You do it. So I'm just looking at you, mad and Nita. It was so, it was OK. I'M gonna head. Talked about this before we got on our podcast. Want to have a lot of what did I was doing on you? No, no, I you. We okay, so we're getting her daddy hold on what's on. Let me like this joint, because maybe I don't even wanted side. I this whole time you've been here and now on my irresponsible mom because I had long nails. And here we go. It's all because you had a fucking dream. Ronning. Come on, Oh my God, go. Okay, so go, but I don't know. You always like for guessing. We were dream and and I remember, and we were I remember pretty well. But we were getting ready to do our podcast, okay, and we're sitting there and I'm like all ready to go and I come with my notes and stuff and you were like, I Needa, I'm gonna have you set this one out, and I just wanted to like try things out and you brought in Sarah. For those who don't know, Sarah is one of my best friends. Sorry, I'm chucking from the weed. Sarah's well, we'd no, no, God's like I've busted done something wrong. Sarah is one of my best friends that's from Australia and that's so funny. And I was like okay, okay. So I just sat there and she and it was always supposed to be a couple of minutes. She did the entire episode. Ye, and I just sat there. And I sat there and I was like so, okay, look, what does this mean? And that was you and directly firing me. Oh my God, I guess I'm not part of this anymore. And it was just it was really bad. Oh my God, I that's the point that like I started, like we got a physical fight. Oh my God, did we have one? Did you wear a dream is and I'm mad at me and real life laughter. I hitched my ass and it was like really bad and like I actually took your head and I know I was laying robot's name and I said, I've never been I don't fight. I don't do that stuff, like in my God, I believe you fight and realize she would have totally kick my ass. Actually, maybe not, I don't know. Oh, I could be a whole other thing. We could try to get in the ring and see if who would win. I don't know, but that Oh no, you have abnormal up our body strings and I do not want to go against your upper body straight in a boxing match. If it were...

...like a full bare knuckle boxing match. I we were fighting because I hated you. I would win because I turned bat shit when I used to do feel I don't even want to talk about the thing anyway. So I'm not that we don't fight. Sorry, don't, but sorry, it was like it was just happening. I was really like I was so upset, I'm telling you. I woke up and I was like drenched and sweat and I was like so angry. I was like why would you do that? Why would you like bring her on? I don't was just really bad. and Are you right now? I yeah, I'll get over it. You know, you're weaken for a bad dreaming, it kind of like sticks within you and stuff like. No, it doesn't. My dreams don't stick with me into my reality. Like come on, Bro, I'm smoking this dub. Maybe you need to take a coup on his maybe, but and real yeah, I'm not for you yet. And speaking of smoking dubis, we just celebrated for twenty, which is amazing because for twenty, for people like me, is a very fun day and if it's even remotely possible for someone like me to smoke more weed in a day, I definitely do. On for twenty I can smoke a whole Christmas tree of wheat on four hundred and twenty two. Just commemorate with that day means to me. And now it's cool. You know I love four hundred and twenty, but do you know what other time of year this is? Anita, what is it? No, this is your favorite time of the year. You don't know what it is. I don't tell me. How on four hundred and twenty to April, April showers bringing hours, favorite time of year. Coach Alla. Oh, I got coach Alaw. It's cold. hellow week. It didn't happen, it didn't have I just I forgot it exactly. This is the second year coach Hell has been canceled because of Covid yes, yes, and I remember last or how Livid people were because we hit quarantine at the end of March. Yes, and I remember I gave birth in April. So we hit the quarantine and like it. March, April. Right. No, I'd like the hard walk down your baby shot and large beginning of March, your March first I shower thing. Yeah, so we hit quarantine. Everyone has their coach hallow tickets, all the performers are lined up, all the celebrities are ready and it got canceled. And I remember people were pissed because it's not just attending a concert, it's a whole thing right, experience. It's like I got to get my outfit ready to the tea, every second of it, every you know, I'd like it my VIP ticket. It just it's just, yes, like his whole outfits right, like I'll people really put a lot of work in. Yeah, yeah, and there's events. There's events and and you know, it's I'm a big like I used to. Oh my God, I've been going for like so many years. Yeah, a couple years. I feel like I'm maybe a kind of outgrown it as I'm a little bit older or whatever. And if I go, I go to second weekend with older people. Go to second weekend really yeah, because it's like I feel like it's a little bit because there's less parties and the the main parties and stuff. First weekend before was so exclusive. They would be like maybe two or three parties rights possible to get into. Now it's just so many parties and it's just as right sponsorships and not advertiser is. Yeah, it's very it's a lot more commercialized and stuff. But you dragged me to the Canon car and me on. Yeah, we drove, yeah, just for that from La it's aroount springs what time do we leave La like APM, ten PM? No, we went little earlier because we had dinner together. That's right. We had a little romantic dinner together and then, and I swear there were no drugs involved. Those drugs? No drugs. We just were silly girls. I just wanted to go and you weren't smoking then already, you know, I wasn't even smoking weed. Then you'd even drink that night. I didn't even drink. I drank a little, but I was driving. So it's trying to be responsible, trying to be responsible, but she drank a little. Do you remember? We were driving back right after the NEON carnival. So this car party goes on to like four Mary. Yeah, we're driving back and I'm kept members of that. I was like falling asleep and we stopped and got McDonald's to wake us up. No, I don't even picked out. Yeah, we got McDonald's really back. Oh yeah, because we were so defeated and starving and I was just falling asleep. It was like the worst drive back. I don't you guys, I've ever been through that, like just trying not to fall site. I drive back from pages full over or just let you like drive. I don't know, it's just like it was. You know, I remember Vanessa Hudgens. Hudgens as how you SARADAS. Yeah, she got a lot of trouble that last year when Coachella got canceled, because she made a very like snotty. It's not a little comment. Her exact words were, even if everybody gets it, like yeah, people are going to die, which is terrible, but inevitable with it. Talking about covid like why cancel it? People are going to get it regardless. Yeah, so I feel like she lost a lot of fans, people were mad at her. She lost, you know, sponsorships, she lost a lot of stuff. So it was like, you know, it was it was interesting to see that that to me, that canceled culture or concept beginning to like cut to certain type of people. It was be careful with what you're saying. Yeah, and I do feel like a lot of people, are celebrities for that matter, are saying things publicly. Then, I think a video or something goes...

...out or something goes public in the vicious backlash comes back and not spirals out of control, which then leads into them getting canceled. Hm, you know, we saw Ellen DeGeneres. That was everyone was shocked when that happened. Everyone thought of Ellen as the nicest, sweetest woman out there and then we're hearing she's like the meanest boss out there. Yeah, yeah, you know. And now I got to be honest with you. I've always been a little partial to Ellen. I've always been a little partial. So I'll be honest with Ellen. There's something about her that I love because she is almost really evil. Like have you seen her shirt game show? Oh Yeah, I had likes to, I mean to her tell like all the funny she looks just really funny. I Love I do. I know she's really mean and she doesn't mean scary boss in Pierson and I feel like a lot of people that get unfortunately, I get to that level. Yeah, there's a whole other conversation. They get that like stress, anxiety, but they also feel like they can't be that for some reason, like they get this like a Dov the diva thing, come right. Very personality, yes, but with her, and I heard Jaylos like that too, but the really her jails are Charlie Sarah and I heard, really I heard she's a mega bitch. I heard she's my friendga bitch. Yeah, but like, okay, then you see people like someone who I love, like Jimmy Fallon. Yeah, you know, and last year Jimmy Fallon got in trouble for something he did twenty years ago on Saturday night live. It was a skit. He was, you know, performing as Chris Rock, which they are like best friends, so he darkened his face, he put on another jacket and he did the whole Chris Rocks yet. Yeah, then twenty years later this all comes up and you know, now he's on a hiatus and I read articles about what Chris Rock was saying because people interviewed him and apparently Chris rock was keeping his mouth shut for a long time because to him it was just so absurd. But when they finally got him to talk, and he is, his response was that is my friend, he's my good friend. I do not I'm not upset and there's not one negative or racist bone in that man's body. Yeah, like, so am I upset? Now he goes? He even said, was it a bad joke? Yeah, it was. It wasn't a great joke. He was. But am I offended by a being like a racial kind of thing? He goes no, but that's that's the thing. You got. The people that are educated smore can can look at that and I'm going to humorous enough, funny way. And then you have the people that just writing to start up fight, are ready to start just again. There just don't have the capacity to understand that. It's like, you know, it's it's just humor. It's yeah, this is what you know, we use this to to make people laugh and too just kind of like bring up, you know, views in the world and just kind of like in a cometic, you know, comedic kind of way. So it's like just just take a step back and just like laugh and whatever. I mean like Sharon Osborne, or you have like all these other well, well, Sharon Osborne walked away. She walked away, but she walked away because she wasn't appreciating what was happening to her and the way they they decided to sort of come at her. Okay, you know, she's not a racist. I think any of her remarks that they were then turning into something like that, you know, and then she didn't get any remorse from anyone to say, like we know you're not a racist, I'm sorry, turned into that. Yeah, so I think she just walked away. Yeah, but do see it left and right. I mean look look at look at Jimmy Fallon, look at Vanessa Hudgens Zoo. These are big named people. And the interesting things like so many of these people, like talk show host, like Jimmy Fallon, they're all comedians. John Stewart, Steven Colbert, Jay Leno, letterman. They were all stand up comedians that turned into these deliverers of political comedy news, right, yeah, and and now, you know, it's like it's like it's the penalty as they're delivering the news but with their own comedy. And you know, so I don't know, it's a bit of a double edged sword and I'm really happy that we have our guests today, Mans Gerbrani and Techron, because they both seen the the comedy industry and how it is to be able to tell certain jokes and not because they both have made a living off stand up comedy based on minorities, Different Cultures, all this stuff. So I think it's going to be a really interesting conversation. Yeah, I'm very young, very much looking forward to this one. Spark up your Dubi's and let's go okay, let me get my second hand. Hahi, he'll do. My first guest is in Iranian American comedian and actor who was born in Iran but moved for a new with his parents at the age of six. After receiving his bachelor's degree at, you see, Berkeley, he enrolled into this PhD program at Ucla, only to soon drop out in order to pursue acting in comedy. He started numerous movies and TV shows like Malcolm in the middle and West Wing, and has performed his stand up comedy all around the world. His stand up comedy style is described as jokes, the focus on race and the Miss Understandings of Middle Easterns...

...in America. I can't begin to explain how many of us one liners. I personally use and everyday conversations and people always laugh. Everybody, please give a genuinely gg welcome to Maz Jo Brownie. Hi Gigi, thank you so much for that kind introduction. As you were saying all that, I was like, Oh my God, such a decorated career and accomplishments and I still can't figure out how to get my stupid wireless headphones to work with my computer here with a wire looking like I'm trying to land an airplane. So what's all that CREP for? What's all that creft for? Zero, zero. I'm a disgrace to every Iranian engineer that would know how to fix this in less than a minute. I want to say that thank you for having me and and and knowing that out there all of us Iranians are doctors, are engineers. I'm sure a lot of them are thinking, Geez Mos Onh my gosh. All right, well, let me hop right into it right now. I want to get my next guest in here. I don't want to, you know, do the small talk, because we have a really good conversation. My next guest is, I what, you know, what I actually I'm going to be honest. I copied his ethnic ethnic description from wikipedia because I'm afraid to say the wrong thing and I'm afraid to represent his cultural background in the wrong way and be the next in line to get canceled, because that's what we're here to talk about, cancel culture. So up, aside from being a friend to mine, my next guest is an African American and Iranian American International Comedian, actor, houst and Radio Television personality. He was born in Washington DC to a Persian father and African American mother who met in College. Growing up in a multicultural, multi religious home, he was able to learn and embrace all levels to his heritage. He soon went on to graduate from George Mason University, and it was there he attended a performance by master Brownie and was advised by MOSS to move to La and pursue acting full time. Being Middle Eastern and black became the perfect recipe for most of his stand up comedy, and nobody does it better. Please give a genuinely gg welcome to my friend Tehran. That was pretty politically correct. That was pretty poorable click. I was actually in law school at the time when moth corrupted me from law school to come to La to do comedy. But wait a minute, I'm on, I'm on, I'm on your wikipedia. It was that from wikipedia? And is my name on his wikipedia? Is that something you got somewhere else? Master Brownie's name is literally on Tehran's. I needed to go idia that. You are an influence in his life. He is, but how did? Because I didn't write my wikipedia. I don't know who did. So how did they know this much information about me. That's pretty more importantly, why aren't I getting ten percent of d you do? That's you know, who were music. That's how it works. We in comedy don't produce each other. If music they produce and they go, just go, do your thing. Give me ten percent. Give them the time. Person, I'm I would be very happy to take a middleman fee because I kind of made this happen. So I'm a Persian. Has the show become right now? How Persian as we show become right now? We're going to take a quick break, but when we come back, when you guys hear something like this and you hear Chris Rock say Jimmy is one of my dear friends, I know that there's not one racist bone in this guy's body, how is it that society can cancel a man like that? How you guys? All right, so I want to sort of pick up where Anita and I left off. Before we brought you guys on, we were speaking about cancel culture and now we're talking about cancer culture in the comedic world. I was mentioning Jimmy Fallon and the stunt that happened with him, about blackface that he was accused of and the year two thousand and he was doing a skit on USNL as Chris Rock, and I guess he darkened his skin and he wore a leather jacket and in the year two thousand and twenty there's all of a sudden this whole cancel culture kind of concept against Jimmy Fallon. Now, I did read into this article and it's said that he was already on a hiatus when this whole situation hit the fan. But whatever it was, it was a very long hiatus. I don't know if he were needed to recover from that. But when you guys hear something like this and you hear Chris Rock say Jimmy is one of my dear friends, I know that there's not one racist bone in this guy's body. How is it that society can cancel a man like that? How? Well, I just I went into my albums and burned all my black face pictures so that nobody can see those, because I don't want to get no. I you know, we just we just we actually have a podcast around and I called back to school...

...with Mazer Brownie. We just talked about that without him Corolla, about this whole cancel culture thing, and I think there's a lot of stuff you got to look at. Obviously, twenty years ago, you can use the Jimmy fowl example, or you can use the Kevin hard example that he was supposed to host the Oscars and and he had said some stuff that was considered homophobic and so he got he wasn't you know, he got polly. They pulled them out from that. So look this stuff that's in the past. I think what happens is if you really are a good hearted person and if you really did not have bad attentions, and back then it was somebody was a more accepted in the culture, whatever it was like, like Peter Sellers in the movie the Party. He made his skin brown and plays a south Indian the whole movie and it was a very funny who was a kid. I loved it. A lot of people love that movie. Now he couldn't do that. So back then, N it was accepted and it was done. And now we flash forward twenty years later. Again, if you're somebody who's intentions are always good and you you you have enough people on your side that will say no, Jimmy Fallon is not racist. This was somebody was done back then, even the person who the joke was made of comes out and says no, this was, you know, comedy that back then. I think that that person survives as Jimmy Fallon has. If you're somebody who's always had kind of a darker heart, or maybe you know, because there are some people who are comedians and or artists who are racist, homophobic, you know, all that stuff. Like you know, there are guys like, you know, lack of a better example, and up with somebody like melt, like Melk Gibson, had a hard time. He's even he's come back and and they've been able to make movies, but he kind of felt from grace when the audio came out of him making all the antisemitic and all the other remarks. So I think you can survive as Jimmy has, if you just kind of, you know, come out and say there's something I did and and I'm you know, I'm not proud of it right now, in retrospect, knowing what we know, because we also got to realize, and I would acknowledge this to I would say that you need, we need to acknowledge a change is happening, whether we like it or not. There's younger people. They're progressive, they see the world differently my own kids. I've been talking to my kids are we had a neighbor who the husband was black and the wife was white, and I was talking about them and I said, yeah, this that the other. You know, Kevin's black as white, and my kids is a few years back their jaws dropped. They go, what's wrong? To Go, he's not black, he's African American, and I was like, Oh wow, in their culture. Now you got to be right with that as well. So basically, I think as performers, as people, we have a choice. We need to be the grumpy old guy who's like these kids don't know. You should be able to throw, you know, an end bomb once in a while, you know, like they're people that actually say shit like that. But I think we also got to go no, wait a minute, if there's a community coming out and saying this is hurtful to them, we have to acknowledge that as well. So again, I think Jimmy survived it and I think that we as artists and Comedians got to be aware of it. Yeah, but is there, is there ever going to be a return? Do you guys, as Comedians, see a return from this. I know Tehran. You being half Persian, half black. That is a very dynamic situation. I grew up having one of my best friends half Persian, half black. So for me I thought it was just a cool, normal thing. You know someone I met you, I was like, Oh, he just speaks far see way better than me, like that was the coolest. But like you in your stand up, I've heard you say the n word in reference to yourself and calling yourself a terrorist as well as a Middle Eastern. So it's like, do you now have to take a step back from saying that? Like no, no one's getting mad if Jimmy Fallon was black and doing a curse rock impression. It's the concept of cultural appropriation, especially for what it's represented historically now when it comes to cancel culture, cancel culture always seems to the extreme because to the privileged, equality will always feel like oppression. That is the concept. Cancel culture is always going to feel hard for the people who are getting canceled the most. But if you look at it, who's actually really getting canceled? WHO's getting canceled? Are you getting canceled because of something you've said, something you've done, or an illegal act that you have committed. When the people who are getting canceled or people who have done illegal things, that's not cancel culture, that's common sense, that's criminality, that's a court case. That's how that works. No one's going out there canceling Anthony Jessen neck, who says and has some of the darkest humor on the planet professionally and is five five specials in. No one's canceling him. No one's canceling Jerry Lewis, who has done yellow face, black face and all the aforementioned,...

...because of the brand and at the time, and now you're looking at it now, no one's going hey, we don't need that MS telephone. Jerry Lewis is a bad person. No one's doing that. When it comes to myself, the when whenever you have selfdeprecating humor, it will always be accepted, because I'm speaking about myself. When it comes to intersectionality, you'll always be accepted because you're still within the realms of that Venn Diagram of who you are as a person. But Ma said it best. It also depends on where you're coming from. People understand are you making fun of them or having fun with them and the audience is much more intelligent than you realize. That same cancel culture that we discussed, for example, in the Lgbtq community, the word fact was something that was thrown around extremely heavily. If you listen to wrap in the S and thousands, it was a normal world, especially the that's the abbreviated version of a much worse word. If right now you squeamed a little and you squeamed a little when I said it, it's because cancel culture work. We don't use that word as openly and expressively and if someone did, you would think less of them. And you know what, Moses kids never would and in the future they won't know that they ever should quote unquote, that it was something that was accepted at or tolerated. It doesn't need to be. So you always have to look at both sides of cancel culture. Honestly, it's if you're getting canceled, be funnier, because when you're funny, people don't cancel you. And I would say I would say also on top of that, you you know some people, the I person, Comedians say, Oh, you can't say anything will no, you can say a lot, like I've been doing stand up this past year under covid and I don't think anyone's tried to cancel the as said, because there's a lot of funny stuff to talk about, from our experiences under covid to whether it's marriage and kids to some political souff. There's a lot of something to say. And the other thing that I would say is a lot of people have grasped onto this term cancel culture and a lot of it is the right claiming that people on the left are canceling them. I can tell you, as a left leaning human being, that I have been pushed at from the right forever, like the whole religious right and the things you can and cannot say or during or politically speaking, like under George Bush, I would make some jokes about the president. He was a Republican and I had people at my show so you can't make fun of our commander in chief, and I was like, that's the whole point of this country. Would mean you're trying to stop me from being able to say what I want to say. And then under trump, for sure, I had people within our own community saying you can't say that Irani Americans and there was a lot of other Americans, you shouldn't be talking about him like that. And I go, wait a minute, and you're the same people to come back and say there's cancel culture, yet you're okay with telling me what I can and cannot speak about. So it's this. This thing is it's been weaponized a little bit to every time somebody, you know, they pull the doctor seuss books. That's not cancel culture, that's the doctor seus estate being smart enough to go, Oh wow, we have fifty books in circulation. Ten of them have really kind of old school demeaning images of Asians in them. We don't need this heat. Let's just pull them out of circulation. They're going to remain in libraries, they're going to remain a but we're not doing a book burning and let's just it's a smart it's a that's a that's a smart financial move on their part. And, by the way, and pulling back when the right start to going, oh, cancer culture, supposedly, from what I heard, their sales actually went up on those books. So all of that to say, listen, we are, end of the day, is a capitalistic society where, in the market place, you go out and say whatever the hell you want whatever's in your heart and if people turn around and go this bastard just offended. You know, Donald Trump came out and said Mexicans a rapist and and drug dealers, and he still got his votes and he kept going, and so there was enough people that spoken his supporter, stood on his side, that he kept going. If a comedian comes out tomorrow and says something about against black people, that person will find out from the market place if their career will keep going or not, because they will either alienate everybody. Or there are a lot of Comedians who have gone the other way where they're criticizing every kind of liberal, progressive movement and they found a lot of love and success on these, you know, on social media, like there's some people that we all know like obviously there's a lot of conservative commentators who make a living out of criticizing cons of cultures. So the more, the more they create this cancel culture thing, the more people are going to be like yeah, that guy's so right because he is kids. I...

...can't even, I can't even go to the you know, to the Delicatestin and, you know, come back with my wife and say that Arab smelled like lamb what it be. Would it be safe to say, without having to criticize anybody out there, would it be safe to say not everybody has the intellectual capacity to understand what is happening in our government, society, economy, all that with a certain set of eyes, as you have just explained. Some of us can see it that way. Some of US can learn how to readopt ourselves in order to adjust to what this is happening. Some of US don't know, and when I say some of US I mean the majority of people don't know and they follow the regular news channels, they read and believe everything that these little tablet deans tell them. They create these stories that they read on twitter, that they see on Instagram, and to them they grow and grow, and that is a larger population than us who understand what's going on. So how do we? For instance, I can say this now because our shots of sense that season nine is going to premiere and in the in the trailer, you can see I'm wearing braids. I'm wearing long braids. I have worn braids throughout my entire life. I grew up always having black friends, so for me it was just a beautiful statement I've appreciation to style, just like when people straighten their hair or curl their hair whatever. So I was bull enough to say I know that I'm not a racist person. I know that everyone knows that I promote equality for people, so I'm okay to make this statement. But, believe you me, I rubbed a lot of people the wrong way and a lot of people, knowing my intentions, were not bating that. I was giving credit where credit was due. Still getting upset. So sure, but gg the path to hell is paved with good intentions. Right. So your intention is good, but you were aware of it when you did it and now you face the backlash. So the concept of freedom of speech is if you do not believe in freedom of speech for those you disdain, you do not believe in freedom of speech. So there should always be different types of speech. That's a free speech society. However, that doesn't mean that there is no consequence to your freedom of speech. There are consequences, and that's what people are having a hard time with, is dealing with the consequences of their actions. In the Court of public opinion, we are all judged and if you're aware of that, that's on you as an ally. It could have been your place to say because I'm aware of it and even though it's discomfort to me, I won't do something. Or you can say, well, I know how I am and I will do something and you face it. The same thing. I'm always late. Mas knows this. So if I get to an airport and I go to my my gaate and the and I'm late for my flight, I don't yell at the customer service agent because I know it was my actions that made me miss the flight. It wasn't the fact that they didn't hold the gate for ten minutes and it was eight minutes and this and that, it was me and my actions. So many people are so willing to change the world gets so few people are simply willing to change themselves. And I would say this about going back to with Terran said about, you know, cancer culture because of some criminal act rights. So we have somebody like a Harvey Weissen gets, you know me too, and we find out, oh my God, he was doing really horrible stuff to human to people, and now he's in a court situation. So we the other thing you had to realize is because of social media, we the reactions are a so much more immediate and be they're amplified. So back in the day, if you were Johnny Carson, who was the predecessor to Jimmy Fallon a cup before, he probably got a lot of letters from people go, and I can't believe you said this, in this, in this and probably got a lot of love, a lot of love, but he also had some letters that were critical. He would read the letters and the chances of that letter being read by all of America and all the world were slim the none. Now, if GIG goes on and puts on her braids on a show, your twitter is going to come some people going to be like Oh, Hashtag, you know, Gig, so appropriate, you know, cultural appropriation, braids or whatever, and now all these people going to be like oh my friend, that so all of a sudden is being amplified. Now there's two ways to go. I think. One is to go, Oh my God, this is really you know, sometimes it's bigger than than you thought and you do have to go out and make some sort of statements somewhere and go look, not, what's that you well, let me use it. The other thing, though. The other thing, though, is a lot of times. There are. There's also the idea of just letting it kind of go, which is part of this wave. And the wave goes and a week later you're back to when you were doing and whoever those crazy people were that were going at you have moved on to something else. So that's, I think, something to keep in mind too. But go ahead to s no,...

...well, I'm gonna, I'm gonna Piggyback off what you just said right now, the way you entered. So you do think that society will just get over thanks eventually, I think, depending on what you said. Look, I get attacked a lot again because I'm very left leaning and and it was again it was our own people. A lot of Iranian Americans, or Iranian whatever in the diaspora were upset that I would make fun of trump because they thought that trump was somehow going to get rid of the molas in the Islamic Republic of Iran. And I always whenever I do any interview, I go look, let me be the first one to say the Irani government is oppressive. LGBTQ is oppressed, their women are oppressed, there's a lot that people are in jail. People you know, there's a lot of bad things happening from that government. But I never have been an advocate for America getting involved with a war and attacking Iran, and I think a lot of these pro trump Iranians wanted trump to somehow just get rid of them, and I don't know what the strategy was. And so because I it, would spoke up against that. A lot of these people would. Every like few months they will, one of them will post something and then they'll start circulating it and then all of a sudden my twitter's just filled with all this like, Oh, you're getting money from the MOLAS and this. I can't even go back to Iran because I've done jokes about the leadership and stuff. So a lot of times I sit there, I debate, I go do I want to engage and start getting into a yelling match with somebody who can understand me in two hundred and forty characters, or whatever the characters is, explain myself to some guy or my just going to let it ride, and quite often I just let it ride and it goes away. Now that said, of course, if I ended up in some huge controversy where, let's say there were an audio tape of me ranting about, you know, black people or Jews or whatever it was, and somebody put that out and it became big or thing. Then that's when I think I may have to then be like, okay, get me on the Ellen show or whoever given on the Colbert I got to apologize, you know. So it's going to end up coming down to whatever the COMEDIANS ethnicity, racial background, religious background, is it? That's the only thing that they can make jokes on. No, I didn't say that. No, I didn't say that. No, no, I'm not, not at all. The comedians should be able to talk about whatever they want. You live and you die by the laughter of the audience and I've seen continue to see comedians. I saw a white comedian the other day make some funny jokes about look again, people, we could construe it however they want. This guy was doing some joke about watching porn and it was a black man who was, you know, well endowed, having sex with an Asian woman and it was like he was very aggressive and he was like, I was caught between black lives matter and stop Asian hate and I didn't know who to root for it. But he made the white guy and they were laughing and you could tell what his intentions were and where he was coming from. He wasn't saying something that was like, Oh, black people are lazy to should pull themselves up by the boots. Stats and Asians are, you know whatever they brought coronavirus. He was a saying that he was coming from another place. You certainly can talk about whatever you want, and again, you live and die by that laughter and your intentions. Also, it's your brand, Jig, it's your brand, like nobody's canceling Gucci Man. He came out, I'm Gucci Man. This is what it is. However, when it comes to someone like having heart, for example, who has had some controversies regarding a tweet regarding extra marital affairs, his brand was I'm the Disney Guy, I'm on Jamanji fourteen. Well then, people are going to attack that the same way that we would attack the Steve Harvey. That's the concept a lot of people don't understand. Social Responsibility, and social responsibility is based on your interaction with society. It's that civic duty that you place yourself. It's the reason why we all understand rape is horrible. We all understand that rapist, our criminals and should be persecuted to the highest extent of the law. We also understand that if a priest or a teacher rapes, rape someone or a child, it's even worse because we don't rely on on on criminals, but we do count on priests or teachers, of people we give a position of hierarchy to because they're in trusted. So their crime is now rape and breaking morality and circle of trust. That's why it's even worse than something that's already extremely worse. The same thing goes with police and it goes therefore, and so on. So when it comes to comedy, nobody is canceling comedians that are funny, Dave Chappelle, who's extremely articulate, intelligent and prolifically humorous. No one. And even the people that are trying to cancel him, you don't see their action being perceived with any credibility of threat. If you're funny and you come from a good place and instead of punching down, you punch up, we can have a conversation. What is Theo?...

What? What is what is punching down? Instead of punching down, punching up. Look, what does that look like punching down is where you had like like after September eleven. There's a lot of stupid, like very easy jokes where people be like, you know, I went to the seven eleven. The guy was like ha ha ha, ha ha ha had I was like whatever, I'll Kada did it, whatever the you okay. Now you make it fun of like Muslims, and now you make it fun of Asians, and now you make it fun of all these people and and there is a certain amount of like get your shit together, like you guys are you guys are animals. You know I'm saying, like like there's even like there was an old tape that came that I saw of Jay Leno, who, again, he's progressed, obviously, but back in the lake s or early s, he'd had some joke about going to the gas station and he's like, back in the day it was a white guy, he'd be like would you like let it or UN let it? I would get it. It goes. Now I go there and there's like a boom, like the bubble. Blood he's doing is prayer rug and he smells like lamb and the basically you're sitting there and the jokes are on that community and like how backwards that community is. And it's not even saying like Oh, you know, you don't even take a moment to say, you know, I know a lot of those people are good people, but this guy in particular, like this guy, was like that. You know, like that, at least you're trying this separate this generalization of a whole community. So that's punching down. Punching up. Is You make fun of, you know, political leaders, you make fun of a lot of time. Self deprecating helps a lot, you know, and a lot of times people get into the whole husband and wife, man and woman thing, which is not so much saying women are bad, but it's like here's my problem, like I'm complaining because I don't know how to I don't know, I can't figure out how to talk to my wife Right. So that's a personalization of it. So I think, as to run said, it's like, look, a lot of people are think of using this excuse because you, yes, we all go to place. These get misconstrued. I've had things get misconstrued. I did a joke on my immigrant special that I thought was pro lgbtq, and yet someone on twitter was like I can't believe in other Netflix special where they're talking about gay people and demeaning when I was like, I'm not being demean I'm trying to be supportive right and talk about this. So you will be misconstrued. But but again, your intentions and who you are and your actions. This goes back to like my whole thing with this. These Irani's attacking me going like Oh, you're with the moles. I go. If you took the time to actually go through my feed, you'd see that anytime someone's jailed in Iran and somebody asked me to do like a post about them, I'm on it. You see, if anytime there's some sort of like movement in Iran, I'm there to support, like I've always I know what my attentions are and I know what my history is, and so if you come and see me, let's say, do a joke about, you know, Indian South Asians, and you go always, always doing South Asian jokes, isn't well, go do a little bit of homework and realize I'm married to an Indian woman and I'm coming from a place of love. And you know, see the other stuff that I've said and done and the fans that I have from that community, and maybe you'll change your mind, that I was not trying to demean you. I mean that's very true, yes, but that's a very rational and logical proction. I it would be ideal to have everybody sort of see it that way. I just feel like it's a lot easier for people to create a Ruckus and just, you know, want to make a big deal out of it. But but that's why you have to that's why you have to ignore and move on, unless if it's really something substantive. So meaning again, if it's something that becomes a big thing, you'll know, like if it's like, oh my God, it's been going off for a week and now people are really like protesting outside the studios and saying gig should not be allowed to wear her hair like that has become a movement. Are you know what? Because I'm going to reach out to my black friends and and whoever's whoever's behind this. I'm going to make a statement, I'm going to put out on all my social media, I'm going to go on some show and go this is what happened. This was not the intention at all. It always coming from a place of love. Blah, blah, blah, and that's when you make it. But what? But for the most part, you know little things in our heads, you know, we see the tweet, we see a bunch of tweets and go, Oh my God, my world's falling apart. Two days later it's forgotten. Is this gg is this allso that you're allowed to braid your hair? Are we doing all this so we can just be like, he's like, can I braid my hair or not? Is that the ultimate question for the show? No, it's interesting me. You know, I don't, I I never want to instult people or any ethnicity or race or religion, but you know, I think certain things are just natural for me to want to do. Like because of the way I grew up. Again, I have curl of frezzee hair. Do you guys see this? It's a Bush of Friz so when I go out to shield all from my ankle, I kind of thought sad,...

...but Gig that's the thing. Most most people are simply going to understand that. So if you allow the loud minority, and when I say minority, I don't mean the marginalized minority, because that is not allowed minority. That's a community. I'm talking about the loud minority trolls will always troll because you give them attention. Do not feed the trolls. Now, when it comes in regards to your hair, let's look at that. When people say things like I don't see color, that also simply means I don't see patterns. So that's not exactly a good thing. The concept should be I do see color and understand patterns, and this is this is the this is the subsequent action I took. So when it comes to like, let's take your hair, because it's something so very tangible to see. On the show where your hair was braided, how many black people or were on that show? Well, none, but let me tell you this to rant. You know, when I said just a moment ago that I offended so many people on social media with my braids, guess what? None of those people were black. All right, can imagine most of the people. That's kind of pay why all black women were supportive, telling me I gorgeous, it's beautiful. WHO's the woman who braided your hair? That mean? And everyone that complained was not plucked, and I'm sure it was a lot of white women of color, because we've seen that as well. And the concept is just because you're offended does not mean you're right, right, just because you're a people feel that way. Like I'm offended, therefore I must be right because I feel this way. Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right. But on the flip side, just because someone's offensive doesn't mean they're right either. There is that fine line in between and more often than not that fine line is comedy. More often than not that fine line is the acceptability. And so it just comes down to bed. But I would say to you, gg for a person who does and I know you personally. I know you have a variety of multitude of friends. Why were there no black friends on that particular show? That's something that you need to understand intrinsically and internally and be like, well, that may have nothing, if nothing else, that may have subjugated you to the conversation live. So that's a station. Tehn, you one time said it when you're stand ups, you're the perfect combination of Shah as of sunset and housewives of Atlanta. Correct. So I can equally ask the same question on when I see the House eves of Atlanta, which they wear calf tans from morning tonight all the time. I can easily say why are there not middle easterns and that show, but people have quite straightening your hair like that. Rihanna, got in trouble, Rihanna, rihanna. Why is it internationality? Is Because, unfortunately, unfortunately, history is two thousand and twenty. Hindsight is two thousand and twenty. So when we look back, and this is the thing about cancel culture, you know, there was a time where polygamy was just the way of the land, where men hadn't many wise, and then there was a time of monogamy was making us way in, regardless of why, or the religious saucity of it all, the mutual implication, where there were people are like, I don't understand why I can't just have lots of wives anymore. There's always going to be a resistance to change. So the reason why is that because historically, unfortunately, more often than not, more often than not, the outcome of set action has been negative. So because there is because there is a history, a pattern of negative outcome, that is where the problem or it becomes problematic. It's like, I know not all snakes are poisonous, but if a bunch of snakes were coming towards my house, I would close the door simply because the one or two that are and it's an unfortunate reality of what has happened. We've taken advantage instead of utilized. Yes, the combination of cultural appeal and and Plateau that exists within our reach. We've taken advantage of it, and by that I mean starting at the top of the food chain, since white men, all the way down, and that's why it's such a touchy subject. Everyone feels marginalized. The the unfortunate truth is many are actually we take it a quick break and when we returned, and also you have to understand something when it comes to celebrity or fame, we don't have to do this, we get to do this. No one asks us to do this, we ask us to do this. So this is the consequence to our one. This is what we placed ourselves and I would say what Teron said earlier about the the vocal minority. That's the other thing you guys, to get to realize, even when you know. I talked about this before on the other on our podcast, where Janet Jackson's nipple came out during the Super Bowl and people wrote letters and it what? I don't think a majority of Americans were concerned, but there was a good enough group of religious right well organized that they wrote the letters and it created this this, you know,...

...backlash against CBS and all that. So, similarly to you, number one one thing is if you're getting criticized, that's actually a good sign. That means you have more people know about you than just your fans who only like you. That means once you start growing, that's going to happen. And I remember one time when David Letterman still had the late show. It was an eye opener for me because because of social media, we all put put were putting ourselves out there every day, and people are going to come in there be like, Ay, hate this guy, hate this guy, I love this girl that you have a nut. You have more people loving you than hating you. That's why you are a commodity to the network and they said we want to keep the show, but you know, keep you on the show because you are bringing eyeballs that of people who might not feel inspired to write you a letter or go online say I love you, I love you, love you they love you. So you have more people loving you that you have criticizing you. And I remember David Letterman, and I remember that was again early social media years, and I'd post the stand up clip and see that you know, somebody, you know again, people liking it in this somebody would not like it. Of It. Oh my God, you know, this is these people are so mean. And then Letterman goes he was doing a joke. He goes, yeah, you know, it's great because they just put in free Wi fi in central park, which is great because that means that lunch time I could take my laptop out there and read all of my hate mail. And I remember hearing him say that. I remember hearing lady Gaga talk about all the hate that she gets from her whatever twenty million followers, and I was like, Oh my God, I can't even imagine like this lady Gaga go on and Scroll through her twenty million and be like, Oh my God, there's so much hey here right because that is ultimate going to happen. So the good news is you're wellknown enough to have gotten people riled up about your hair and the best thing you can do is just to turn off your social and just put it away and be like this is who I was, this is why I am. I know me, my friends know me, the people that know me, the Coun't know me, and that's all I can answer to. I'm not here to answer to a whole movement of people who were trying to kill me. To me, this totally off. Oh, you have to understand something when it comes to celebrity or fame. We don't have to do this, we get to do this. No one asked us to do this. We asked us to do this. So this is the consequences to our one. This is what we placed ourselves when people are like, oh, so and so got canceled, you PS is hiring. They don't have to be on CBS. They can go and get a job at McDonald's. McDonald's doesn't care whose nipple was out. Trust me, my cash here in line her nipples out every time I go there. So no one's asking those people to be canceled. It's we put ourselves in the public light. Therefore, we are subject to the public. That is how we make our money. Then that is where our intentions lie. We have to be aware of that. That is how it works. So when Roseanne makes the statement which was personally attacking me, to be honest, but Muslim Brotherhood and planet of the age had a baby. Equals VJ and reference to Valeri Jarrett, WHO's an African American part of the Obamacam cabinet, who was born in Iran because of her parents, her parents diplomatic status. She's saying this on a tweet when she has a nationally televised show that caters to African Americans, Iranyan's and the American public at large. That's that's a responsibility she had. No one rose in can she can go work at Fedex. Fed X doesn't care. She tweeted that. Yeah, and the pushback on. Listen again, that goes back to the weight of what you're doing. If you are to show and you decide to wear your hair certain way, or if I'm going to show and my comedy show and I'm saying things that I think are supportive with the Lgbtq community and somebody comes at you or to come at me, and they go, oh, how dare you this and that I go oh, maybe misunderstood me, but that's not where I was coming from, and that can kind of end there well, you have somebody who attacks. This is again punching up, punching down, in that case rose ane and was attacking Valerie Jarrett based on her looks. That's punching down. That's like saying you're ugly. Hey, whatever you want about bowery, Jella Jarrett, politics, no one canfuls that person. Yes, that's actual opinion. That's going back to what Tehran was just saying. It that we were chosen to do this, for us to do this. I can relate to that in a large sense because I was asked to do this with a group of my friends, you know, to allow cameras into our lives, to document our lives. But I'm also now in bed. I'm a family with not just bravo, with all of MVC universal,...

...because those people have now created who I was without cameras, into that same person, but with a lot of cameras and faint exactly fight when you're but I can't, I can't go on that same show to Haran and say I don't know like f these type of people. I mean, you know what I mean, because if it's not in good taste to the people I'm committed to my workplace, as well. It's just it's doesn't make sense for them to want to keep me. But that goes back to what Tearron was saying. I'll say it's real quickly with that goes back with Terre, I'm was saying when Rose Ane has her own show on ABC, like she needs to keep in mind. Oh my God, I ad show on ABC and Disney. This show is doing great numbers. All these people working because of me, all this UFF. So now here I am and I'm upset at Valerie Chair and I hate valery chaired. Well, you know what was in pick up the phone, call your cousin, you know Julie, and go ahead, you see this bitch and random rave to Julie. Get it off your chest and move on. Don't be so stupid to go on twitter and tweet that in again punching down. You're going to offend black people, you're going to offend Middle Easterners and you have something mistake, which is this bigger thing, which also then, is is responsible for all these people that you, I'm guessing, love that, from the guy who's the grip all the way to the caterer. They all, you know, lost their jobs. I mean they brought it back because they brought it another version of the suit. But it is a little hard to say don't go on social media and tell the world higher feeling, when for the last four years, our our president was sort of using social media to teach us that that's what we're supposed to do. And so I feel like we're in a really fire you doing here now? Where are we? Do We express ourselves? Do we not express there as does something? Do we do it? When President Obama graduated from Harvard Law Did everyone all of a sudden go to Harvard Law School? Why are we all quick to pick up bad habits but not good habit? Not only that, not on that. But believe it or not, that guy had four years of job security and he had a lot of people supporting him and they love that stuff and he probably had some mental illness for he couldn't stop talking about that. Because I personally the politics. I don't know, I don't know. Listen, I personally like I sometimes I'll be like, you know, I know people like I have managers and agents and friends who go you should tweet more and you should do more of this, but I'll do it for a day or two then I'm like, I'm exhausted, I just let it go. This guy would wake up in the middle of the night just tweet away. So he had his own issues going and again he had enough people supporting him where there was a there's a whole industry built on him saying what he's saying. But let's go back to what we said at the beginning of is what's in your heart? This guy trump and his heart. I believe was a lot of bad, malicious, self serving stuff that was happening and there was enough people who were kind of came out of the crevices and the holes or were like, damn, I agree with him, and they were like you'd be like, what about the kids in the cage? Just well, you know, they should becoming very legally well assigns seeking asylum as legal well, I don't care. Okay, what about this? So they can't make an excuses. So people's heart and where they come I'm came out so similarly. As a comedian, as a performer, as an artist, you got to say where, where is my heart? When I'm making a movie about something going on in whatever, some inner city or something going on another country, or it's a love story. When I do a love story and I make the lead character one black one white, I'm saying something, I'm making a statement, and what I'm making is I'm making a statement that, hey, this is good, we should do this, whereas I could also be, and I'm sure this has happened, I could be the guy in charge of a movie and someone in the room might say, Oh, I had a black actor come read for the part, and I might be like no, no, it's got to be white now. Am I racist? Maybe, or maybe that's just how I want to tell the story. But end of the day, people's intentions come out. So we have people in the artistic world who have bad intentions and those come out. And listening audience got us so many writers, especially writers, but just people in the industry of TV, film, writing and all that. Why are so many people quitting? Why are so many people feeling defeated and filter that they can't even be themselves anymore? If it's based on intention, if it's based on where your heart is, how do we go? But I don't know, I don't know if there's that many. I am not I don't know if there's that many people quitting per se now. I know that...

...because, at the same time that you say people are quitting, I see a lot of every day there's a new show, there's a new program and there's a lot of diversity, there's a lot of young people, a lot of talented shows. You know, ten fifteen years ago, the show Rami never would have been made because the networks would have been like what an Egyptian kid in New York trying to get laid? No, that's not going to happen. You know, Muslim, Egyptian. But here it is and it's an award winning show. Ten fifteen years ago, perhaps the show like mindy never would have been made because the networks, I. I've been doing this for twenty two years. You'd go in and they'd be like well, we you know, they would hint about it. They wouldn't say it like this, but they would hint like, Oh, you need more white characters in this story is too round. Middle America is not going to like this. So as much as you're saying people are quitting, I don't know who's quitting and I don't know why they're quitting, but I know that there's a lot of talent coming up. You know, you see it all the time. You know he's a Ray. You know Dysius Sumuro. I mean there's all kinds of stuff and it's black and it's woman and it's Latino and it's and it's Middle Eastern and it's so there. I think there's a lot. I've heard older white writers say they don't know what to do because it said, when I get in the room I don't know what I can say. Yeah, side from SI fellow was one of them. Yeah, it's the stand up. He was saying. Is a stand up going on campuses and all that stuff. Yeah, but again, I'm listen. I don't know. I mean if your intentions are good and you want to tell stories in the stuff, I mean there's still plenty of shows this season that it were created by older white dudes. I mean there is no shortage of that. A more courtier shows. Being on the topic right now of white dudes white people, I want to shift the gears as far as my questioning and I want to sort of understand this is a bit of a sensitive question, I guess. So take your time and however you want to respond or not. But I noticed in a lot of comedy with people like US minority people when we make jokes. Of what we hear jokes, it's a lot of reference to the word white people. Sure, right now, if that were a white comedian and they reference like everything to black people, this, black people be like this, but right that would be a very different situation, very different circumstance. Why is that okay that we reference white people in such an easy way out of our mouth? Sure, so, let me first give a shout out to all the white people that know we don't mean them when we say white people. So the fact that you think we mean you, that means that's a problem with you. You're not white. Your next okay. So that you see a lot of people fall back because there's an intersectionality where they're like, well, what about, for example, Anti Semitism? We understand that, but you still benefit from white privilege. White privilege is nothing to do with having perfection. You can still have a horrible life and be white. The concept is the color of your skin is not what added on to that horribleness, and the concept is white presenting is white when it comes to privilege, even if it's not in the hierarchy. So if I'm a white presenting black person. I also benefit from white privilege. I'm a lighter skin black person. I I benefit more than more so than a darker skin black person. That should be an awareness. So that's number one. So right there. Let me explain that knowledge, because people don't understand what white privilege means. Why? Privilege simply means the color of your skin is not going to be the deterring factor or the determining factor of your success and or failure. It would be the same thing if I was a if I was and I'm tall. I'm six two going on sixty three. If I was six eight or seven feet tall, I might not be in the NBA, but my height would not have been the precursor of why I was not in it. There are a lot of tall people that work exceed yes, the concept is that would be your height is not the determining factor of if you make it or not. If you're seven foot tall, you have a better chance of making it to the NBA. I'm sorry I had to interrupt that because I do feel and I don't want to speak up for the black people your black side. Be An idiot to speak up like that, but there's a lot of people who would disagree with that and say, yes, being block is a determining factor of making it or not making it. The Wind. Black people cannot walk down the street without but that's talking about white privilege, not black. Okay, Factors. Yes, right, that's the concept is if you're white, you're right, you're right, you're right, you're white. That's yeah. So of course the concept is sure to get it right. This is black and white, this is black and white, black and white. Let's concept in this. So the concept is the concept of White Brithers presents itself and that factor. So there is an intersectionality you can have. You can be poor and white. That's not that's no one says...

...that's not a case. So when you say, well, when white people feel this way, and why can you make it about white people, it is because historically, when, first of all, when you're in power, it would be any group of power talking about a marginalized group versus the other way around, any group. If black people were in power, it would be the same thing and they wouldn't be allowed or shouldn't talk about white people. But they're not. So if a black person says white boy this or white boy that that white boy doesn't end up being lynched. So whatever, if, no matter what, the worst thing I can call a white person maybe our cracker crackers are delicious. Crackers are great when you're sick. What's the worst word you can call a black person? Is there an equivalent word? That's all part of privilege. All these little things add up and even though their grains of salt, grains of salt become extremely heavy when you have a huge pile, then they become some the heaviest minerals on earth. So the concept is they all add up and that's the disparity. So this goes to the point of punching down versus punching up. If I punch up, I can make fun of Brad Pitt. He's good looking and successful. You know, I'm not going to make fun of I'm not going to, quote unquote, make fun of a kid who bows up to the show in a wheelchair and is deaf and new and or blind and black and trance and, you know, just pile it on. That would be what am I actually doing there? I'm punching down and it's horrible. So that's what it is. And so those same white writers were like I don't understand. I was in a writer group and they were like, well, I want to write a black woman, but if I write one and then I get in trouble if it sounds terotypical, so I tend not to write one. How do I fix that? I don't know. Hire black women to be in the room. That's the easiest solution. We don't see that historically, and that and that also, by the way, couple of things. I agree with that because I've read scripts before where they're writing for a Middle Eastern character and they don't. They clearly don't know any middle easterners, because you know they'd be like, you know, in the name of the law and the God and the the and I go, I don't my dad never talked like that, like who, who is this character? Like they basically imagine what we would sound like. And it's the run said. If nothing else, call some to go to a restaurant and be like hey, are you Persian? How would you guys say this phrase? You say this, and the same thing with women. Think and and tern's actually right. That whole thing of like say hey, white people this, and then why can't I say black people this? First of all, a lot of Comedians do go on stays ago. White people do this, black people do that. I mean they that's that's a given. And we even have white comedians will go on sometimes and you know t's somebody who's black or Asian or whatever in whatever the stereotype is, and that black person will laugh because they're again the into intentionality of what it is. Right. It's like I'm going to I'm laughing with you, not at you. I've seen black audience members laughing at White Comedians having fun with them. So let's just get that out of the way, number one. But number two the thing with, like Terron said, when we get hired to go and perform at a corporate event, the best thing we can do is find out who the boss is and start either making fun of the boss or talking to them like we got control here. So one time I was in Dubai and I was doing a show and it was a subsidiary of thing, was yahoo or something, and they were that with the founder. Was this Guy Jerry Yang, who was one of the founders and he was there at the event and I made the beginning of my show was all about Jerry. What's up, man like what about? Where's my stock? And you know, like I wasn't making fun of him, but I was talking to him the way all the people would want me to would want to talk to him. And so similarly, when you go in there and you're like white people, you guys are crazy and Bubba, bubba bump, you are making fun of the plantation owner, you are making fun of the guy who has been oppressing these people for so long, right, and so it's, it's it's people can laugh because they need to laugh, because even the white person's got to laugh, to be like Aha, because that white person is not a plantation owner. But they understand, when make fun of them in that way, that that it's it's a historically, there's a history to this. Right. So, you know, I'm trying to think specifically of some jokes that either I've done or I've heard tem Rondo or somebody, where you might say like you know, you know why people whatever. Whatever. You're in a room, let's say, with a bunch of Middle Easterners, and there's a white guy, oh, you know, hey chuck, you know like yeah, you didn't think we're going to take over, but a year you're surrounded now, buddy, you know, and it's like, oh, but you're making fun of the fact that, well, you get, well chuck. You guys took our oil for fifty years, so I guess it's okay for us to take your comedy club for one night. Right, motherfucker. You know what it's like. It's so that's that's fun and funny,...

...as opposed to, you know, reversing it and having a white guy, you know, come into a room filled with you know, and find the one black guy and be like, you know whatever he says. But then you're like, Whoa, you've pressed black people for four hundred years. Now you're going to go shit on them at the comedy club as well, you know, saying, yeah, punch up, not down. So would it be safe to say and start to sum up the fact that the two of you are wholeheartedly where you are in your passion for your work and that you're not really going to change your style or demeanor of writing your comedy? No, that's not true. Now, it's not true. What I'm saying is, I won't be bitter, I'll be better when I change, I'll change for the better. I'll become better, I'll be funnier. I'll learn how to say something that I want to say without hurting someone. I don't want to hurt. That's what I'm saying. I don't want to live in a world where you're not allowed to say the in word. I want to live in a world where people don't want to. There is a difference. So why do you why do you get to say it in stand up? I understand this is something that I have a conversation with people all the time. especially white people, will be like, well, we wouldn't say it by people say it all time. Why can't we say it? Well, I understand that's a different conversation, but I'm saying other people, but I'm saying. I'm saying, shouldn't you lead the life you want people to understand and respect? No, that's this is the concept of the conversation. Is No to the first part of your question and yes to the second. So yes, I do leave a live a life that I want people to live. Not even do as I do, as I say, not as I do. I do as I do. But here's the reason why black people can use the in word and it's something. Never mind the historic connotation and the negativity and the reclamation of the word. Never mind that if Mars has a wife, must caused his wife baby, booby, Love, e whatever, but if I called his wife baby, he would be Hella mad at me because it would be disrespectful to the relationship that they have. That's the in word for black people. We have a closeness based on a unique experience that exists that other people should respect simply because you understand how closeness and intimacy and interaction works. How simple of an idea is that? You don't call your friends, boyfriends, baby. Do you gug like Hey, baby? You would probably not do that, and not in a sincere way or not in a in a fun way. Even if you were close in them, you would probably not use the same terms and act the same way towards them as the great. Believe it. I believe in Polyamory, so I might call everybody baby, but if someone who doesn't, if you, you know what, I've never seen you call Tommy. Maybe right. Oh, no, exactly. Want to laughs. Exactly. You know how to say. I would I would say this is I actually, because look, we are we are, no matter what we say. The world is moving forward and it's there's going to be backlash, there's going to be conservative, you know, response is always to pull back, pull back, pull back. I want to be able to say what I used to say. I want to be able to do the act that was doing, etcetera, etcetera. But the Jett if you want to say current, you have to move with the generations that are younger than us. So you know, the twenty year olds, whatever they're saying, you're doing. And I found personally an evolution in my own stand up where early on in my comedy, when I would do a character from any different background, I would do the accent. Yeah, and I was pretty good at doing the accent and I like doing the accent. But recently I've caught myself not going into the accent because it almost has become hacky to do the accent. I think. So it's almost like not only am I thinking all my defense somebody, but I'm thinking, God, I sound outdated if I go on stage and I'm like, Oh, I ran into this, you know Asian, and they were like Oh, whatever, the stupid thing was. You have a very amazingly hilarious skit that I love that you do because your wife, like you said, his Indian. It's the boot, boot, reboot. Would reboots do it with the accent and without an accent? How wouldn't? You can't be funny. It would just well, he's married to an Indian, so he's talking about something that's close to him right in his own life. I don't do that joke, but also also that in all honestly, I was and I started with on that at all. Started with me doing I do a pretty good impressure to my fatherin law. So I was literally doing him. But the truth is now now, when I do bring up Indians, I know honestly, like I don't lean into the accent anymore, like I catch myself on stage if I go blah, blah, Blaha Indian. Whereas ten fifteen years ago I was totally comfortable going into the accent I played in name characters on TV shows. Now I'm going more and more into let me just do it, like let the joke work for the joke as opposed to the work the joke working for the accent. So that's definitely an evolution that I've had and a lot of it's come from these younger generations coming and, like I feel like they're...

...look at him be going like yeah, and you brought up Jerry Signfeld. GG. You brought up Jerry Signfeld, and I'm hoping that Nita speaks at some point so we're not as sorry I'm so quiet. It is quite in my life. You want to, it's up to you. It's up to you. Something we love. But you brought up Jerry Seinfeld and him being reluctant to go to colleges and speak to the kids because the kids won't understand. Its comedy. It's like, but you're also sixty six years old, jerry sound felt. Why are you going to college and talking to it? Would you want, when you were in college, did you want to sixty six year old to be your your icon of progression? That's not how it should work to begin with. I see the same thing even in music, where it's like people are like, Oh, and when I was a kid, music was great, but now the music sucks. Why are you listening to the same thing your fourteen year old son is listening to? Move on, move on. This is your time. Now, this is every generation has that. And now all that, all that is melding together where we don't understand it as well. But that's the concept progression, social progression. I always I don't talk about politics, but I always talk about principles, and social progression is always going to benefit society and we've seen it constantly do so. Who the concept is? Ten years ago, let's not forget the fact ten years ago RESA would not have been able to marry legally Mary Adam. That's a real thing. Now we look at it like why would that have ever been a thing? We forget that was a thing. Right. That's social progression and if the people that had their say and their way, that would never happen and resident Adam would never have their day. So just remember this and the overall macro expression of every single micro regression. For years ago, RESI wouldn't have gotten a visa to come to America because of the Muslim band. So just think about that as well. Even though it's Jewish, he would have been stuck any roun. He never would have met Adam, he would have met some guy named Audam or whatever the name is, and try to get married around. Wouldn't worked out. By the way, Tehron would like to be named Tim Ron Seinfeld from here on out. He's gonna take all of Jack. I was every brilliant, every gig that Jerry Sipel says he doesn't want to do it. Colleges, Tam Rondill do. I'm felt brilliant, but he never thought to have minorities on his show because he never thought of it. Someone today, Johnny sign felt, would that's a progression. Yeah, very sign felt friends. They lived in New York and they didn't have black friends and when they did she was a supermodel. Now it would be a group of friends and they wouldn't even think not to have people of Latin egx color of black people in the because that those are just their friends. Progression is a good thing if we allow it to be, but it's painful, just like any maturity when you're when you're going through puberty, it hurts and we're going through it now. Thank you, guys. I mean that was a very progressive conversation and I want to sort of like end that with a comment, a quote that I actually read recently and I think it's sort of adds into this. It was by Adam Brodie and what he said was it's not really a cancelation, it's more like a cultural course correction, and I do feel that we are sort of all on the same page. Is that's sort of what's happening right now, and it's a good thing it's the brody said that. Yes, let's cancel him. I don't even like that. That's Gould have been mark. That's going to have been mark. What our care son, Adam. Oh my God, thank you, Mas Joe, Ronnie, thank you. Thank you, guys, for being here. You guys are both very intelligent individuals, very smart, witty, and humor adds to all of that. So I really enjoyed picking your minds for this short bit of time. It was really, really cool. But before we go, I'm going to finally talk now. I got canceled. I'm gonna get Hashag me to you. Cannot raise your arms. She's like, I'm a cancel because I what do you got? Okay, so we like to do with with her guests, just to kind of like, kind of change this, you know, pace whatever. We play a game and it's called forgive me, I have sinned, and so I asked as a question. Then it's one question to for both of you guys, and you guys have to answer it here before okay, so what's the most insanely embarrassing joke you have used and one of your shows pertaining to yourself? That is actually true, Moss, I'm going to have let you go on this one. First, most embarrassing joke. That's actually true. I was trying to do a bit when we first started getting trying to get pregnant with my son, who's our oldest. We were we were trying and it wasn't...

...happening. So I went and got tested to see how my sperm was and I was told that my sperm had low motility. I don't know if you know what that means. That meant the sperm is slow and I was like what. So I was on stays talking about that and then I talked about how this is true. To get the test, they were like, Oh, you need to get this tube and go into the bathroom and master but ejaculate into this tube. So this, this. I did all this on stage and then I said, and they said I was. It was in Beverly Hills. They didn't even have their own bathroom. The lady was like, okay, so you're going to walk out of here, go out, there's an office, you go to the first floor, you go to the office floor and I was in this office building like trying to, you know, have sperm, go into this little thing to go take it back for them to tell me my stupid sperm was had low motility. So that was that was kind of sharing a lot of my my most embarrassing moment is hearing Mas tell that story. I'm embarrassed for how are you going to follow that storey? Come here's the thing. I don't have my my humor isn't as I'm cool. I'm the Cool Guy Right. My huper isn't based on being embarrassed in that matter. But there is a story I tell about Magic Johnson's birthday party. That that is sure an exaggeration, but the basis there and I think it. You'd have to it's a it's a you have to be there. Ten runs, ten Ron Sperm is fast. Yeah, fast, okay, okay, so let's go into the second one, and tetern a'll you start with this one. Okay, when it comes to sex, have you ever underperformed or finished too quickly, and, if you have, like, do you use comedy to kind of get yourself out of that situation? That's it. That's a fun that's fun. So some fun question, the fun question. Okay, so it's not specifically guilty or not, but I'm going to assume that at some point every man has underperformed and or ejaculated quickly. So I'm going to say yes, there's not one specific time that stands out. there. Actually, that's not true. There is comedy when we do it too fast. Is One specific time. And to help, there is one specific time that does stand out where there was this girl that I liked and for some reason I just was not physically attracted to or, even though I really liked her and she was very physically attractive, but I wasn't attracted to her, and I often used comedy to get out of that situation, even though it's like mentally I was extremely stimulated and I understood. I understood logically she was extremely physically attractive, but I just for some reason was not physically attracted to her, and I just very funny about that. Id like, was she so hot, but your Dick don't don't get hard, like Dudn't like. How do you? How do you look? I'm not a comedian. Early I can't even see. You know, I don't know. I like not now, WHO's they're not my erection, like I need to go, you know, saying it just wasn't it wasn't. It wasn't it. For some reason, me too, tear on. I use the knock knocks agan I said, I said knock, Knox said WHO's there? I said, I see, said I who? I said I came. That was it. That was it, and I left. Where you in the bathroom with the to when that happened? I was in the bathroom and that's when I found out that my sperm was faster than I thought. Two kids fast, two kids fast. Oh my God. Thank you, guys, so much. You guys, and if you guys want to know more, that's again. That was the game. You play the game. I think we tied. there. Are we tired? I gotta go. I gotta I gotta pay the bathroom. Had all that Tahere. We embarrass both of you before it's done with this rule. Okay, we have another question. If you guys. No, no, no other question. The question. Let us sign off now. I'm talking you. Keep that. Keep that for the next episode. We'll do it. We'll do the second episode. Let's do another one. I would love that and I will tell thank you guys so much. You thank thank you. Bye. I'll see you. I'm Bax and wax and ready to party. Why? I bet sucks. You're so funny. I love you. Oh my God, that was fun and funny. Yeah, I was definitely blown away. I was like silenced because I was so into that, like I was just like sitting back...

...as like an audience. You guys going back and forth. It was amazing. No, I feel like. I feel like it was like we asked a question and Mas and Teshron just sort of went through our entire notes on their own, like it was so beautifully done. You're going through. I didn't even need to look at my nose. You always going to pay for work or making noises. You didn't need to. I really enjoyed that. I really enjoyed that. I would love to do another interview with them. Yeah, and they would have to leave up a good topic. Talk a little bit more. What we to say? What would you say that maybe you took away specifically from this conversation? I think for me, the fact that you have to progress, and I do agree with that, because I it's true. Like I do, I say I complain. I'm like a music right now is not really whatever. So I either just need to understand that, like this is what it is now. This right what you have to you know, either accustomed to it or you just don't say anything. I just keep listening to my own, you know whatever music. Sand with Jerry Seidfeldt, I agree. I brought that up and I think that, yeah, he never really had it was always just it wasn't a very diverse show in a sense. And so then for him to go talk to these colleges and stuff, that's true. Like no one, these kids don't want to see him. He doesn't come from that by. So again, I think you do have to adapt, you have to move on if to progress. I agree with that, but I also feel like they are kind of saying that they do need to watch out a little bit. Yes, I got that towards the end. I feel like it was a little bit more confidence throughout the conversation that as long as your heart is in the right place, your intentions are in the right place, it shouldn't matter. But I think towards the end is when the progressive conversation came in, that we have to kind of adjust ourselves to what society needs, emotionally, physically, you know, psychologically, whatever. So that was actually interesting because my conversation that I brought up with me wearing braids. This is not something I just started recently because I'm on TV or anything like that. This is something I've done for years. My first driver's license when I was sixteen years old. I'm in braids, you know. So actually the only time I got arrested in Iran was because I was wearing braids all the way past my ass and just hanging all over the place. So I would never mean for something to be offensive, but those days are very different than these days. Yeah, me wearing braids now, I have to know. Let me immediately get on my social media give the positive credit to where it's do, because that's where I got the idea. Let me let them know I value what you guys did from me. Thank you. Yeah, and I feel like maybe because I've had that approach, I haven't had backlash yet from black people or the African American or African Community. It has been towards people of noncolor. Yeah, you know, and I was just a really cool conversation to have to hear you know what they thought, especially someone who is half Black Cassa. Yeah, yeah, I agree. You know. Well, that was that was nice. And you know, if any of you guys want to know more about Master Branni, you can find him at Mas Joe Branni and find Tehran at I am Tehran. They are both Hilarious, they are witty, intelligent. They have so much out there about them on Netflikes, Youtube, you know, social media. You'll just you'll have a laugh literally with these people. So do what I do. Smoke a fat. We saw do the sit back, watch some comedy, get your little rookie friends like a nita high from secondhand smoke. It's I don't yeah, I don't think I got high enough for this one. No, no, I because I think I was so into the conversation I didn't even move my eyes from the screen. I want, I didn't want to look at my joint. So like, it was so moving, it was so much information and I had to keep up. Oh my God. Yeah, all right, guys, thank you so much again for listening to an episode of genuinely Gigi. If you enjoyed this and you want to hear more, please, please, please, write a review. Give me your ratings. Subscribe. Subscribe, subscribe. Thank you, guys, all for listening. I love you. Thanks for listening to genuinely Gigi. download new episodes every week and, if you haven't already subscribe, be sure to leave us a rating and review and, while you're at it, check out some of the other great shows available on Straw hunt media.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (42)